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Jimmy Fallon is Getting His Own Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Flavor Called ‘The Tonight Dough’

Jimmy Fallon is Getting His Own Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Flavor Called ‘The Tonight Dough’

Fallon unveiled a giant version of his newest Ben & Jerry’s flavor on the Tonight Show with Ben and Jerry in tow

Fallon’s flavor sounds like cookie dough on steroids, and we’re definitely not complaining about that.

There’s nothing “ew” about this amazing new Ben & Jerry’s flavor inspired by Jimmy Fallon. Unveiled in person by Ben and Jerry on last night’s Tonight Show, the newest Ben & Jerry’s flavor is “The Tonight Dough.” It’s a chunky concoction of caramel and chocolate ice creams, chocolate cookie swirls, and gobs of chocolate chip and peanut butter cookie dough. That’s a mouthful (actually, we’ll take several mouthfuls).

“I love working with Ben & Jerry’s. And I’m not over-hyping; I’m not overselling — we’ve made the best ice cream ever created,” Fallon said in a statement. “It’s so insanely good and I’m just happy to be associated with it. And the proceeds go to a great charity.”

Proceeds of the ice cream sales will go to the SeriousFun Children’s Network, a non-profit that provides seriously ill children with summer camp experiences.

This isn’t the only flavor Fallon has worked on with Ben & Jerry’s. A few years ago, the ice cream mavericks released Late Night Snack, which featured chocolate-covered potato chips. Sadly, that flavor entered the Ben & Jerry's flavor graveyard earlier this year. Want more late night ice cream flavors? Be sure to grab a few pints of Ben & Jerry’s Saturday Night Live flavors.

You can buy The Tonight Dough for $4.89 a pint at grocery stores nationwide. When you're digging into the pint of Jimmy Fallon-inspired ice cream, let us know which Ben & Jerry's flavor is your favorite by voting in our survey of the best Ben & Jerry’s flavors ever. Vote now!


[UPDATED] Jimmy Fallon's New Ben & Jerry's Flavor Tastes Like Your Favorite Childhood Candy

It's so limited edition you won't find it in grocery stores.

UPDATE: November 2, 2017 at 9:15 a.m.

Wednesday on The Tonight Show, Jimmy Fallon revealed that his secret new Ben & Jerry's ice cream flavor is called Marshmallow Moon, a vanilla ice cream with marshmallow and graham cracker swirls and fudge chunks.

Marshmallow Moon is the first flavor in a new line from the Vermont creamery called Special Stash, "a series of micro-batches that can't be mass produced or widely distributed," according to their website.

If you were lucky enough to be in The Tonight Show audience last night, you already were able to get your hands on a pint since Fallon gave on away to everyone there. Otherwise, this flavor is so limited edition you won't be able to find it in your grocery store's freezer aisle. In fact, the only two places you can try Marshmallow Moon is at Ben & Jerry's scoop shops and on BenJerry.com in very limited quantities, starting today.

ORIGINAL POST: October 20, 2017 at 3:51 p.m.

Ben & Jerry's is releasing a brand-new ice cream with Jimmy Fallon in November&mdashbut the flavor will be kept under wraps until then.

The Tonight Show host has previously collaborated on two other flavors with the Vermont ice cream makers, including "The Tonight Dough" in 2015 and "Late Night Snack" back in 2011.

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"The Tonight Dough" is a mix of caramel and chocolate ice cream with chocolate cookie swirls and chocolate and peanut butter cookie dough, while "Late Night Snack" is vanilla bean ice cream with a salty caramel swirl and fudge-covered potato chips.

While Fallon has kept mum about this third Ben & Jerry's flavor, he did let Willie Geist of the Today Show have an exclusive sample earlier this week. But since Fallon wouldn't let Geist reveal the flavor, mix-ins or even his reaction &mdash joking that he'd blur his face as he tasted the new ice cream &mdash we'll all have to wait until November to see what Fallon has in store for us.


15. Ben & Jerry's Milk & Cookies

Sometimes it's just the way the cookie crumbles, but ranking 15th in flavorfulness is no mean feat. Although "Milk" & Cookies starts with a basic foundation of vanilla ice cream, things get complicated fast with the addition of chocolate chip and chocolate chocolate chip cookies, along with chocolate cookie swirl, seemingly for good measure (and chocoholics).

It didn't do well in terms of nutrition, considering it's been slammed for containing soybean oil, which has high levels of inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids.

Those who love the flavor nurse a nostalgia for retro childhood pleasures such as the wholesome act of dunking a homemade chocolate chip cookie into a glass of rich, creamy milk. Detractors, however, are also purists who accuse Ben & Jerry's of "messing with" the even more classic cookies and cream. As offended consumer reviewer spookym griped, "I never dunked my cookies in vanilla flavored milk when I was a kid."


Jimmy Fallon Introduces New Ben & Jerry’s Flavor, Marshmallow Moon

When Jimmy Fallon and Ben & Jerry’s collaborated on an ice cream flavor a few years ago, they came up with Tonight Dough, a decadent concoction that quickly became a fan favorite and earned it a spot as one of Ben & Jerry’s top ten flavors ever.

Now, Ben & Jerry’s and Jimmy Fallon are partnering again, releasing an all-new “Special Stash” flavor called Marshmallow Moon, which features vanilla ice cream with marshmallow, graham cracker swirls and fudge flakes. I don’t know about you, but that sounds like a frozen s’mores to me. YUM!

Jimmy Fallon introduced the special dessert last week on The Tonight Show, where he said its name made perfect sense “because the Tonight Show logo has a moon, and I have a body like a marshmallow.”

Marshmallow Moon kicks off Ben & Jerry’s Special Stash offering, where the ice cream maker will churn out small-run artisan batches of funky flavors available in Scoop Shops and on Ben & Jerry’s e-commerce store for fans to purchase for a limited time only.

So what are you waiting for? If you’re suddenly hankering for a pint (or two) of this deliciousness, you should hurry up and order some before it’s too late. And Jimmy Fallon will be donating all of his proceeds from every pint sold to the SeriousFun Children’s Network, a global recreational camp for children with serious illnesses, so you’re supporting a great cause to boot!


18 His First Role Was On Spin City

After dropping out of college, Jimmy had big dreams of making it big as a comedian in Hollywood. By the age of 21, things were looking good.

He had moved himself to Los Angeles, and found himself a manager who helped him secure various stand-up gigs in the city. In 1995, he was only making about $7.50 a night to appear on stage at improv nights, but that didn't discourage him!

He joined an improv group called The Groundlings, and started to make a name for himself in the local scene. In 1998, he landed his very first televised role, in the sitcom Spin City. He was cast as a photographer, who was hired to take photographs of people outside of an event. He had less than 5 lines in his scene, but the small exposure helped to get him on the map! His scene was filmed alongside Alan Ruck, who plays Cameron in cult classic film Ferris Bueller's Day Off. Even without a big amount of lines, that in itself must've been a huge moment for Jimmy. He was one step closer to his ultimate dream, landing a role on Saturday Night Live.


When Fallon was the host of Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, Ben & Jerry’s created the flavor Late Night Snack in his honor, too—vanilla ice cream with swirls of caramel and chocolate covered potato chips. Fallon will continue his reign as television’s king of late night talk show-inspired ice cream next month, with the release of an all-new third flavor from the Vermont creamery, but he’s keeping exactly what it is tightly under wraps.

Fallon sat down with Willie Geist of the Today Show to sample the new flavor exclusively. He wouldn’t let Geist reveal any of the ice cream’s flavors, toppings, or even his reaction to the confection, joking that he would blur his face and change Geist’s voice as he tasted the treat. Geist did a great job keeping the secret, giving not a single hint about what we might expect when Ben & Jerry’s reveals the new ice cream on November 1.

The talk show host seems to have a special interest in making celebrities try secret ingredients—he has a whole segment of his show dedicated to the concept, to which he’s subjected both Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain, with hilarious results. Thankfully, the secret ingredients in his Ben & Jerry’s ice cream won’t stay secret for much longer, and everyone at home will get to have a taste.


When Fallon was the host of Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, Ben & Jerry’s created the flavor Late Night Snack in his honor, too—vanilla ice cream with swirls of caramel and chocolate covered potato chips. Fallon will continue his reign as television’s king of late night talk show-inspired ice cream next month, with the release of an all-new third flavor from the Vermont creamery, but he’s keeping exactly what it is tightly under wraps.

Fallon sat down with Willie Geist of the Today Show to sample the new flavor exclusively. He wouldn’t let Geist reveal any of the ice cream’s flavors, toppings, or even his reaction to the confection, joking that he would blur his face and change Geist’s voice as he tasted the treat. Geist did a great job keeping the secret, giving not a single hint about what we might expect when Ben & Jerry’s reveals the new ice cream on November 1.

The talk show host seems to have a special interest in making celebrities try secret ingredients—he has a whole segment of his show dedicated to the concept, to which he’s subjected both Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain, with hilarious results. Thankfully, the secret ingredients in his Ben & Jerry’s ice cream won’t stay secret for much longer, and everyone at home will get to have a taste.

This article originally appeared in Foodandwine.com

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Brothers killed in drive-by shooting ɽidn't expect to die,' family says

At the home of Abdulaziz and Mohamad Abdullah, their half-eaten food remains on a plate, their shoes at the front door. "Never to be worn again," said a family member, whom CBC Ottawa is not naming because of concerns for her safety. The two men — Abdullaziz, 34, and Mohamad, 27 — were shot dead in a drive-by shooting outside an Alta Vista strip mall Friday evening. A third brother, Fawaz Abdullah, who was shot in the leg and underwent surgery at hospital, is expected to survive his injuries. Ottawa police believe the shootings, and the men, were targeted. The drive-by shooting occurred just after 6:30 p.m. The brothers, believed to have been unarmed at the time, were shot near their white Range Rover at the sidewalk edge of a packed parking lot at the intersection of Alta Vista Drive and Dorion Avenue. Eyewitnesses who described the confrontation told CBC they heard gunshot after gunshot. Police and paramedics descended on the area. One of the brothers was found dead inside the vehicle, while another was on the ground. Police covered the driver's side window of the SUV with a white sheet and placed a yellow tarp on the dead man on the ground. They cordoned off the entire parking lot and plaza, which contains a Shoppers Drug Mart and Tim Hortons, with police tape. A group of men stood watch across the street Friday evening near the bodies of their slain friends, their numbers slowly growing as police remained at the scene. The family said it was Fawaz who alerted relatives and friends about what happened, telling his mother and sister that his brothers had been killed. At the family home, mourners arrived to offer their condolences to a family struck by unimaginable tragedy — three brothers shot in one evening — and police officers stood guard through the night, the family member said. History with courts Two of the Abdullah brothers have a history with the criminal courts and gang-related violence. Abdulaziz Abdullah, or "EZ," has been convicted numerous times for gang-and-gun violence. He was due in court in Toronto in September to face an attempted murder charge. His convictions range from gun possession to being an accessory after a homicide. He was also convicted for his involvement in a 2008 gang-related drive-by shooting in Ottawa's south end. In 2011, Abdulaziz was convicted of brandishing a gun to get rid of people from a hotel party. He then barricaded himself inside a room and a six-hour standoff with police ensued. He was convicted of possessing and carelessly handling a semi-automatic handgun. The parking lot of the Alta Vista Drive strip mall where 34-year-old Abdulaziz Abdullah and 27-year-old Mohamad Abdullah were shot to death on May 28, 2021, is seen here the following morning. (Uday Rana/CBC) Court records tell the story of a family that tried to steer him and his brothers away from a life of guns. He came to Canada from Kuwait when he was seven years old, according to the sentencing decision from the hotel case. After youth brushes with the law and "what his family considered to be undesirable friends," the family returned to Kuwait. Abdulaziz returned to Canada in 2007, and criminal charges and convictions continued. He pleaded guilty in October 2016 to being an accessory and getaway driver in the 2015 homicide of Sharif Said. Fawaz, or "Caesar," was charged with two counts of attempted murder in a drive-by shooting in 2014. He pleaded guilty to lesser firearms charges in 2016 and was sentenced to three years and 131 days in prison. 'They paid their debt' Despite their mistakes, they didn't deserve to be victims of such violence, their family member said. The three brothers, along with their sister and mother, are the only members of the family living in Ottawa, the woman said, adding that the brothers were devoted to their mother and family. "But when with boys in the street, they were different men," she said. "Every time they leave the house, they are afraid it's their last day because of mistakes in the past." They came to Canada as immigrants and grew up in a rough neighbourhood, the woman said. There were times that the family — devout and religious Muslims — distanced themselves from the brothers. Despite their negative past, they were still loved, respected and had a family. They were truly victims. - Family member But in recent years, the woman said, they were growing up and becoming adults. They recently celebrated Eid together. They were making plans to plant a garden. Their mother, the woman said, refused to leave them because she feared if she did that, they would choose the wrong path for good. On Friday evening, Abdulaziz and Mohamad "didn't expect to die," the woman said. They were all just innocently hanging out together, as brothers, in the parking lot. "They paid their debt to society," she said. "Despite their negative past, they were still loved, respected and had a family. They were truly victims." Police appeal for information Since the killing, police have found a white Acura parked in Kanata South off of Old Richmond Road that was reported stolen from Toronto, according to police sources. It's believed to be the getaway vehicle used in the triple shooting. The Abdullah brothers' deaths are the fifth and sixth homicides in Ottawa in 2021. Police do not believe that Friday's double homicide is related to the fatal shooting of Abdulkadir Yusuf earlier this week. They are asking anyone with information to call the homicide unit at 613-236-1222 ext. 5493.

A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Saturday, May 29, 2021

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Saturday, May 29, 2021. In Canada, the provinces are reporting 463,184 new vaccinations administered for a total of 22,809,939 doses given. Nationwide, 1,877,968 people or 5.0 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 60,185.684 per 100,000. There were 9,700 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 25,994,734 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 87.75 per cent of their available vaccine supply. Please note that Newfoundland and Labrador, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis. Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting 30,656 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 291,575 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 556.833 per 1,000. In the province, 2.13 per cent (11,161) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland and Labrador for a total of 358,370 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 68 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.36 per cent of its available vaccine supply. P.E.I. is reporting 9,044 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 87,861 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 553.877 per 1,000. In the province, 8.11 per cent (12,868) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 105,595 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 67 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 83.21 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Nova Scotia is reporting 77,294 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 560,843 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 574.694 per 1,000. In the province, 4.43 per cent (43,252) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 651,450 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 67 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.09 per cent of its available vaccine supply. New Brunswick is reporting 51,654 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 451,363 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 578.641 per 1,000. In the province, 4.87 per cent (37,999) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 533,805 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 68 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.56 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Quebec is reporting 104,204 new vaccinations administered for a total of 5,306,336 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 620.142 per 1,000. There were 9,700 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 5,887,119 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 69 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 90.13 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Ontario is reporting 159,775 new vaccinations administered for a total of 8,690,473 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 591.628 per 1,000. In the province, 4.25 per cent (624,920) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 10,075,515 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 69 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Manitoba is reporting 23,236 new vaccinations administered for a total of 816,984 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 593.305 per 1,000. In the province, 7.06 per cent (97,180) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 944,890 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 69 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 86.46 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Saskatchewan is reporting 14,351 new vaccinations administered for a total of 693,625 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 588.24 per 1,000. In the province, 5.74 per cent (67,723) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 815,975 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 69 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 85.01 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Alberta is reporting 52,820 new vaccinations administered for a total of 2,668,567 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 606.211 per 1,000. In the province, 8.45 per cent (372,151) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 2,945,025 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 67 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 90.61 per cent of its available vaccine supply. British Columbia is reporting 73,458 new vaccinations administered for a total of 3,106,269 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 605.325 per 1,000. In the province, 3.14 per cent (160,885) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 3,511,360 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 68 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 88.46 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Yukon is reporting 114 new vaccinations administered for a total of 52,649 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,261.628 per 1,000. In the territory, 59.34 per cent (24,763) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 57,020 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 140 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 92.33 per cent of its available vaccine supply. The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 52,237 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 1,157.761 per 1,000. In the territory, 51.74 per cent (23,344) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 63,510 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 140 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 82.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply. Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 31,157 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 804.55 per 1,000. In the territory, 36.44 per cent (14,113) of the population has been fully vaccinated. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 45,100 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 120 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 69.08 per cent of its available vaccine supply. *Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as some approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 12 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial. This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 29, 2021. The Canadian Press

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Pressure for Senate rules change after GOP blocks 1/6 probe

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pressure is mounting on Democrats to end the practice of requiring 60 votes to move legislation through the Senate if they hope to advance President Joe Biden’s agenda. Earlier Friday, Republicans blocked a bill that would have established a commission to investigate the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. Fresh off the defeat, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer set up a June vote on another crucial priority — an elections overhaul bill that confronts restrictive new voting laws emerging in several key states after Donald Trump's loss in the 2020 presidential election to Biden. The ambitious elections bill has been seen as a defining test case for changing the Senate filibuster rules that require the 60-vote hurdle in the evenly split chamber. Democrats see the legislation as a vital step toward protecting voting systems, but Republicans are unlikely to give it much support. The stunning GOP rebuke of the proposed bipartisan commission on the Capitol riot, on a 54-35 vote, accelerated the argument, showing Democrats — and perhaps the broader public — how intense partisan loyalties are likely to make it difficult for Biden's party to strike bipartisan compromises on elections reforms, infrastructure or other parts of his agenda. “We have seen the limits of bipartisanship,” Schumer told reporters at a news conference after the vote. “Everything’s on the table.” The filibuster is a Senate procedural rule that requires a vote by 60 of the 100 senators to cut off debate and advance a bill. With the Senate divided 50-50, Democrats would need the support of 10 Republicans to move most bills. The vote on advancing legislation to create a commission to investigate the insurrection highlighted how reluctant the GOP will be to cooperate. While some senators prefer to stick to the long-standing rules, despite the often cumbersome process, others say the time has come to lower the threshold to 51 votes. The vice president of the party in the White House — currently Kamala Harris — is able to break a tie. “I will tell you that when it comes to voting rights and democracy, we have to defend the democracy, not the Senate,” Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga., a leading proponent of the elections and voting rights bill, said ahead of Friday's vote. Overhauling the filibuster would require the support of a majority of senators, but not all Democrats are ready to do so. Two centrists, Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, are holdouts against any efforts to alter the filibuster, preferring to stick with the current practice, which typically requires bipartisan compromise. But in a rare joint statement as tensions rose ahead of Friday's vote, Manchin and Sinema expressed exasperation with Republicans, imploring their colleagues not to stand in the way of a bipartisan commission to investigate the assault by a mob loyal to Trump seeking to overturn Biden's election. Manchin told reporters at the Capitol that the opposition to the Jan. 6 commission was “disheartening.” Sinema did not vote. As the Senate was considering the commission, Trump continued to push his false assertions about the 2020 election and its aftermath, which have collectively been dubbed the “big lie.” His persistent attacks on the integrity of the 2020 vote are sounding alarms among Democrats — and some Republicans — that more must be done to shore up Americans' faith in the civic process. Despite Trump's repeated accusations of voter fraud, dozens of judges and elections officials across the nation, along with his own attorney general, have found no evidence of a rigged election. The bill headed for a vote, the For the People Act, is vast, tackling a range of interrelated issues that Democrats say will protect the vote and curb special interests. Republicans say it is too broad of a federal reach into state and local election systems. It would mandate early voting, same-day registration and other long-sought changes that Republicans reject. The measure would also require dark money political groups to disclose anonymous donors. A version has already been approved in the House. The Democrats see the sweeping elections overhaul, which would establish numerous federal standards for elections, as the only path to push back against a raft of legislation advanced by Republican state lawmakers in statehouses across the country. As of mid-May, 14 states have enacted 22 new laws with provisions that make it harder for Americans to vote, according to research by the Brennan Center for Justice, which supports the Democratic proposal. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has warned Democrats off any changes to the filibuster, though leaders of both parties have changed the rules over the years to lower the votes required on the confirmation of judicial and executive branch nominees. Congress is now out for a weeklong Memorial Day recess. In the letter to colleagues, Schumer said the elections bill would come to a vote the week of June 21. ___ Associated Press writer Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta contributed to this report. Lisa Mascaro, The Associated Press

Health Canada extends expiry for some Ontario AstraZeneca doses by one month

TORONTO — Ontario received permission from Health Canada to extend the expiry of some doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine on Saturday, saving thousands of shots from potentially going to waste. A spokeswoman for Health Minister Christine Elliott said the change means doses with an original expiry of May 31 can now be used until July 1. "Health Canada has issued an authorization to extend the expiry date of specific lots of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine from six months to seven months, following the review of submitted stability data," Alexandra Hilkene said in a statement. Pharmacies and physicians offices had been rushing to administer thousands of shots this weekend ahead of their previous Monday expiry date to avoid wasting doses. Ontario had been trying to redistribute a stockpile of 45,000 shots expiring on May 31 and 10,000 more going bad in June. But quality checks held up the delivery of thousands of the shots, and many didn't reach their final destinations until Friday. The head of the Ontario Pharmacists Association said Health Canada's decision is not unprecedented when it comes to evolving data associated with a new vaccine. "It's good news," Justin Bates said. "Although I do appreciate this is going to create a lot more questions . so people can continue to make an informed consent decision." Bates said pharmacies in different parts of Ontario had ramped up efforts to get shots into arms and avoid wasting any doses, and those efforts will continue. "It does give us a longer runway and reduces the risk of any (waste), which I think is a good thing and that's the silver lining in all of this," he said. The province paused the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine earlier this month due to an increase in reports of rare but deadly blood clots. It started offering it again this week as a second shot to people who received the dose between March 10 and March 19 at pharmacies in Toronto, Windsor and Kingston, and at some primary care offices. Approximately 90,000 people participated in an AstraZeneca pilot between March 10 and March 19. The province said 148,972 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine were administered in the past 24 hours for a total of over 8.8 million doses issued over the course of the immunization effort. Ontario reported 1,057 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday and 15 more deaths linked to the virus. Meanwhile, Ontario's COVID-19 science table said Saturday that the province can re-open schools safely on a regional basis while still limiting the risk of further virus transmission. The new advice comes in response to Premier Doug Ford's request for input on whether or not the province should reopen schools as cases trend downward across the province. The group said some regions could reopen based on the advice of local medical officers of health and continued adherence to public health measures. "We believe that Ontario can re-open schools safely on a regional basis to mitigate the significant short and long-term harms arising from school closures, while managing the risk of virus transmission in this sector," the group said in a letter to Ford released Saturday. The province closed schools in April as COVID-19 cases surged and Ford has said he wants a consensus on the issue from stakeholders before making a decision. Ford wrote to those experts and education stakeholders Thursday, giving them a day and a half to respond to a series of questions on the possible reopening of classrooms for in-person learning. The premier has said he doesn't want to rely solely on the advice of the province's top public health official, Dr. David Williams, who believes students should return to the classroom. "I know very clearly where Dr. Williams stands,'' Ford said Friday. "But I want the scientists to weigh in. I want to make sure the teachers' unions weigh in. I want other educational workers to weigh in. I don't want to rush this.'' The science table said in Saturday's report that the closure may be harming some students' physical and mental health and reopening would allow schools to re-establish contact with teachers and peers. "This deterioration is now evident in the form of increased ambulatory care use and hospital admissions, most poignantly for children and youth with eating disorders," the report said. "We believe these mental health indicators represent the tip of the iceberg and that children and youth mental health will present significant long-term challenges during our recovery from the pandemic." The science table recently said reopening schools could cause COVID-19 case rates to rise between six and 11 per cent. But the group said Saturday it now believes the resulting case increases from re-opening schools would be small and most public health units feel that they can manage those increases. "Schools that re-open should maintain their public health measures vigorously and build on the strategies they have already deployed to limit spread," they said. The group also called on the province to use the summer to improve school ventilation and continue efforts to vaccinate students. The letter from the province's science advisers was co-signed by 10 other groups including the Ontario Medical Association, The Hospital For Sick Children and the Council of Ontario Medical Officers of Health. This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 29, 2021. Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

Belarusians increasingly cornered after EU cuts air links

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — As fear of repression rises among Belarusians following the arrest of a dissident journalist whose plane was forcibly diverted to Minsk, those who want to leave the country are feeling increasingly cornered. Its land borders already were under tight restrictions, and now the European Union has banned flights from Belarus after a jetliner was diverted to Minsk earlier this week and authorities arrested a dissident journalist who was aboard. That leaves opposition-minded Belarusians with few options to get out from under the authoritarian rule of President Alexander Lukashenko. “Shutting the borders turns Belarus into a can of rotting preserves. We are being turned into hostages,” said Tatsiana Hatsura-Yavorska, who leads a rights group that helps those released from prison adapt to life and also organizes documentary film festivals. “The authorities have scaled up repressions in recent months to incite the atmosphere of fear,” she told The Associated Press. Hatsura-Yavorska said most of her friends and associates have faced detention, searches and brutal beatings, and many have fled Belarus. She served 10 days in jail after organizing a photo exhibition about medical workers in the coronavirus pandemic that authorities decided leaned toward the opposition. She faces charges that could land her in prison for three years. Lukashenko, who has led the former Soviet nation of 9.3 million for more than a quarter century, has faced unprecedented protests after his reelection to a sixth term in an August 2020 vote that the opposition rejects as rigged. He has responded to the demonstrations with a fierce clampdown that has left more than 35,000 people arrested and thousands of them beaten. Hatsura-Yavorska said following her arrest last month, she was put in an ice cold cell for two days without a mattress and was forced to wake up every two hours at night. The authorities released her after 10 days on the condition she not leave the city pending a criminal investigation on charges of “organizing actions that violate public order.” “Who would like to remain in such a country?” she said by phone. “The authorities have divided all citizens into loyalists and enemies, and treat us accordingly.” Hatsura-Yavorska's Ukrainian husband was ordered to leave Belarus along with their 9-year-old son and was barred from returning for 10 years. “They used my son to blackmail me. They beat me during interrogations and threatened to put me in jail and pushed me out of the country in the end,” Volodymyr Yavorskyy told the AP in Kyiv. “I couldn't imagine that I would find myself in hell in the middle of Europe. Belarus is being shut closed right before our eyes, and millions of Belarusians are finding themselves hostage." He communicates with his wife via the internet, but fears the Belarusian authorities will move to tighten controls over it. “Public protest has continued, and so the authorities . close everything they can reach — borders, organizations and websites,” he said. “They are turning Belarus into a scorched land.” Belarus tightened restrictions at its land border in December. Those willing to cross must explain their reason, such as work, medical care or education, and can only do it once every six months. On Sunday, a Ryanair plane traveling from Greece to Lithuania with dissident journalist Raman Pratasevich aboard was diverted to Minsk after Belarusian flight controllers told the jet's crew to land there because of a bomb threat. Authorities then arrested Pratasevich, who ran a channel on a messaging app that was used to organize demonstrations against Lukashenko. EU leaders denounced it as akin to air piracy and responded by barring Belarusian carriers from the bloc’s airspace and airports. “The air boycott has hurt not only the regime but ricocheted against its opponents willing to leave the country,” said Artyom Shraybman, a Minsk-based independent political analyst. While Belarusian carriers have been banned from EU airspace, they are allowed to fly to other destinations. Arriving in Tbilisi, Georgia, on a flight from Belarus, a man said “people are trying to leave and those who can go to Europe are trying to do so.” The traveler, who asked to be identified only by his first name, Anatoly, for fear of reprisal, said the Ryanair flight’s diversion has deepened his concerns about his country's course, noting that “people can’t guarantee their future, can’t guarantee the future of their children.” Alena, another Belarusian traveler who similarly asked for her last name to be withheld, said people who can afford to leave Belarus will try to do so amid what she described as a “brutal” government response to protests. Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya, the main opposition challenger in the August vote, urged the EU to ramp up sanctions and banish Belarus from Interpol and the International Civil Aviation Organization to increase pressure on Lukashenko's regime. But she also demanded that the country's land borders be open. “I understand the EU's decision to halt flights over Belarus as it's a matter of security for all Europeans,” said Tsikhanouskaya, who fled to neighboring Lithuania under pressure from the government shortly after the election. “But we demand to open the land borders for free travel of Belarusian citizens, because we can't allow the regime to turn our country into a prison for 9 million people.” ___ Follow all AP stories on Belarus at https://apnews.com/hub/Belarus. Yuras Karmanau, The Associated Press

Ontario extends ban on interprovincial travel until June 16

The Ontario government has announced that it has extended its ban on interprovincial travel until June 16 as part of its emergency measures implemented to slow the spread of COVID-19. The ban, which applies to non-essential travel, affects Ontario's land boundaries with Manitoba and Quebec. In an email on Saturday, Stephen Warner, spokesperson for Ontario's solicitor-general's ministry, confirmed the extension, saying the order will remain in place until June 16 and it is being imposed in 14-day increments. "We will communicate with the public prior to its termination," Warner said in the email. The original order was made on April 16, 2021 and was set to be revoked on June 2. It has now been extended by 14 days. Under the ban, the government has restricted travel into Ontario from Manitoba and Quebec, with the exception of travel for the purposes such as work, health care services, transportation and delivery of goods and services or exercising Indigenous or treaty rights. At the time that the order was imposed, Health Minister Christine Elliott said in a news release: "The rising spread of variants means we must take stronger measures to limit transmission and prevent our hospitals from being overwhelmed. "As we continue to work to vaccinate those in the areas with the highest rates of transmission, everyone must adhere to public health measures and stay at home as much as possible to protect capacity in our health system and the health of thousands of Ontarians." Ontario's stay-at-home, meanwhile, remains in place until June 2.

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Saturday, May 29, 2021

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Saturday, May 29, 2021. There are 1,374,275 confirmed cases in Canada. _ Canada: 1,374,275 confirmed cases (39,903 active, 1,308,932 resolved, 25,440 deaths).*The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers. There were 3,206 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 104.99 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 22,154 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,165. There were 31 new reported deaths Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 278 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 40. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.1 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 66.94 per 100,000 people. There have been 34,550,157 tests completed. _ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,293 confirmed cases (100 active, 1,187 resolved, six deaths). There were 14 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 19.15 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 67 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 10. There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people. There have been 267,847 tests completed. _ Prince Edward Island: 202 confirmed cases (12 active, 190 resolved, zero deaths). There were two new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 7.52 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of two new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero. There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. There have been 161,140 tests completed. _ Nova Scotia: 5,497 confirmed cases (585 active, 4,832 resolved, 80 deaths). There were 40 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 59.73 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 348 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 50. There was one new reported death Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of four new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 8.17 per 100,000 people. There have been 798,079 tests completed. _ New Brunswick: 2,181 confirmed cases (140 active, 1,998 resolved, 43 deaths). There were nine new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 17.91 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 68 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 10. There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 5.5 per 100,000 people. There have been 338,979 tests completed. _ Quebec: 369,318 confirmed cases (4,758 active, 353,442 resolved, 11,118 deaths). There were 419 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 55.49 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,924 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 418. There were four new reported deaths Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 43 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is six. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 129.66 per 100,000 people. There have been 9,152,249 tests completed. _ Ontario: 528,453 confirmed cases (15,438 active, 504,304 resolved, 8,711 deaths). There were 1,273 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 104.78 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 9,473 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 1,353. There were 14 new reported deaths Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 132 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 19. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.13 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 59.12 per 100,000 people. There have been 14,952,303 tests completed. _ Manitoba: 50,144 confirmed cases (4,676 active, 44,426 resolved, 1,042 deaths). There were 497 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 339.02 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,640 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 377. There was one new reported death Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 20 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.21 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 75.55 per 100,000 people. There have been 787,725 tests completed. _ Saskatchewan: 46,285 confirmed cases (1,371 active, 44,378 resolved, 536 deaths). There were 122 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 116.32 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 975 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 139. There were two new reported deaths Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 12 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.15 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 45.47 per 100,000 people. There have been 849,440 tests completed. _ Alberta: 226,449 confirmed cases (9,277 active, 214,966 resolved, 2,206 deaths). There were 512 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 209.8 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,438 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 491. There were seven new reported deaths Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 42 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is six. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.14 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.89 per 100,000 people. There have been 4,489,984 tests completed. _ British Columbia: 143,581 confirmed cases (3,529 active, 138,360 resolved, 1,692 deaths). There were 317 new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 68.55 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,208 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 315. There were two new reported deaths Friday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 25 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 32.87 per 100,000 people. There have been 2,704,672 tests completed. _ Yukon: 84 confirmed cases (zero active, 82 resolved, two deaths). There were zero new cases Friday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero. There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 4.76 per 100,000 people. There have been 9,129 tests completed. _ Northwest Territories: 127 confirmed cases (two active, 125 resolved, zero deaths). There were zero new cases Friday. The rate of active cases is 4.43 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero. There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. There have been 23,157 tests completed. _ Nunavut: 648 confirmed cases (15 active, 629 resolved, four deaths). There was one new case Friday. The rate of active cases is 38.12 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been 11 new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is two. There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people. There have been 15,377 tests completed. This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published May 29, 2021. The Canadian Press

New Brunswick hits 60 per cent with one shot of vaccine, reports 10 new virus cases

FREDERICTON — Health officials in New Brunswick say just over 60 per cent of residents aged 12 and older have received a first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Officials say more than 46,000 people have been at least partially immunized in the past week. The province is also reporting 10 new cases of the virus today. Five cases have been identified in the Moncton region, four in the Fredericton area and one in the Bathurst region. The province has 143 known active infections with seven people hospitalized, including six in New Brunswick and one out of province. Two patients are in intensive care, including one patient in the province and the patient hospitalized in another province. This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 29, 2021. The Canadian Press

Ontario to replace Dr. David Williams as chief medical officer: media reports

TORONTO — Media reports say Ontario is replacing its chief medical officer of health more than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic. Multiple anonymous sources told the Toronto Star that Dr. Kieran Moore will replace Dr. David Williams as the province's top doctor. Toronto's CityNews issued a similar report. Moore currently heads up the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Public Health Unit. Representatives from the premier's office, the Ministry of Health and the Kingston-area public health unit did not immediately respond to The Canadian Press's requests for comment. Williams has faced much criticism over his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ontario's COVID-19 Long-Term Care Commission lambasted Williams' response during the early days of the crisis. The government-appointed commission said Williams and the government repeatedly ignored the warnings of scientists, doctors, local public health officials and even the minister of long-term care. More recently, Premier Doug Ford has ignored Williams' recommendation to reopen schools for the last month of the academic year, turning instead to dozens of public health experts, local health units and education stakeholders for advice. That marked a departure for the premier, who has previously voiced strong support for Williams and even asked him to delay his pending retirement to remain at the helm of the province's pandemic response. Ford's decision on whether to reopen classrooms is expected in the coming days. This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 29, 2021. The Canadian Press

Nova Scotia reports four COVID-19 deaths, highest single-day total in last year

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia is reporting its highest single-day death toll from COVID-19 in just over a year with four new deaths related to the virus. Health officials say the deaths include two men in their 80s and a woman in her 70s in the Halifax area, as well as a man in his 80s in the western zone. The province's previous single day high was recorded on May 3, 2020 when six people died as a result of COVID-19. A total of 84 people have died since the beginning of the pandemic. Officials also reported 33 new cases of the today, with 21 in the Halifax area, seven in the eastern zone, three in the western zone and two in the northern zone. There are 566 known active cases of the novel coronavirus in Nova Scotia and 43 people in hospital, including 18 in intensive care. The province's chief medical officer of health gave his condolences to the families of those who died in a news release Saturday, along with a warning to the public. "I cannot emphasize enough how critical it is to follow both the letter and the spirit of the public health measures to prevent further illness and death from this virus," said Dr. Robert Strang. "We must never forget that it is all around us, and that is why it is so important we loosen restrictions and reopen slowly and gradually." Nova Scotia announced what it called a cautious plan to lift lockdown restrictions that have been in place since the end of April on Friday. Premier Iain Rankin unveiled a complex, five-phase strategy that won't progress until the province meets certain vaccination rates and hospitalization numbers. This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 29, 2021. The Canadian Press

Brazilians stage nationwide protests against President Bolsonaro's COVID response

RIO DE JANEIRO/BRASILIA (Reuters) -Brazilians staged protests against President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in at least 16 cities across the country on Saturday, carrying signs such as "Out with Bolsonaro" and "Impeachment now." Bolsonaro's popularity has plummeted during the coronavirus crisis, which has killed more than 460,000 Brazilians as the far-right leader played down its severity, dismissed mask wearing and cast doubt on the importance of vaccines. Organized by leftist political parties, unions and student associations, Saturday's protests in the capital Brasilia and in Rio de Janeiro were peaceful, but in the northeastern city of Recife, police threw tear gas and shot rubber bullets.

Fearless Puppy Adorably Plays With Giant English Mastiff

Gunner the English Mastiff gently plays with Hudson the puppy in this heartwarming clip!

The Liberals' path to a possible majority government runs through Quebec

Quebec will loom large in the next federal election and recent moves by the Liberals suggest they're making a play for the Bloc Québécois-held seats that stand between them and a majority government. On a number of files — the protection of the French language, Quebec's plans to make changes to the Constitution and Bill C-10, a piece of legislation with broad support within the province — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has struck a pose of openness to Quebec. The Liberals are hoping voters in the province will be just as open to them. Polls suggest the party is on the threshold of securing the majority government it failed to win in 2019. According to the CBC's Poll Tracker, an aggregation of all publicly available polling data, the party would win around 171 seats if an election were held today. The Liberals need at least 170 seats to win a majority government — which means their current polling levels don't give them much margin for error. Quebec is an important piece in the electoral puzzle for the Liberals. It might also be the best place for them to find many of the seats they need to reach 170. The Poll Tracker's seat projection model suggests that the Liberals have more upside in Quebec than anywhere else in the country, with the potential to pick up as many as nine more seats in the province. The Liberals' best-case scenarios for gains elsewhere suggest they could win eight more seats in British Columbia, six in Ontario and five in Alberta, along with another five seats sprinkled across the Prairies and Atlantic Canada. But some of those gains are easier to imagine than others. Not all potential seat gains are created equal Let's start on the West Coast. To get those eight B.C. seats, the Liberals would need to win ridings in the B.C. Interior, defeat Independent MP Jody Wilson-Raybould and prevail in tight three-way battles with the Conservatives and New Democrats in parts of the Lower Mainland. In Ontario, the question is whether the Liberals have hit their ceiling already. The party won 79 seats in Ontario in 2019, just one less than the 80 seats they won in 2015, when the Trudeau Liberals got their majority government. The Ontario seats on the Liberal target list include some rural ridings — some with well-ensconced incumbents and some located on the edges of the Greater Toronto Area. In both Ontario and B.C., Liberal gains would have to happen in politically distinct regions where the party would have to defeat both Conservatives and New Democrats. There's no guarantee the Liberals could pull that off. What about Alberta? Let's be serious — the Liberals winning five seats there might look plausible on paper, considering the swing in the polls there since 2019, but that would require the Liberals to overcome enormous margins without the benefit of incumbents. Amarjeet Sohi, for one, is too busy running for mayor of Edmonton to try to win his Edmonton Mill Woods seat back. Despite the likely effect of Alberta Premier Jason Kenney's unpopularity on federal Conservative numbers, the polls may be again underestimating Conservative support in the province.(Government of Alberta) The polls also significantly under-estimated Conservative support in Alberta in 2019 and could be doing so again, even if Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is a drag on federal Conservative numbers. Polls improving for Liberals in Quebec That leaves Quebec. The Liberals won 35 seats in the province in 2019 the Poll Tracker now puts the likely range of Liberal wins in the province at between 35 and 44 seats. The top end of that range would put the Liberals — who were 13 seats short of a majority in 2019 — more than two-thirds of the way to the promised land. The seats in question are overwhelmingly francophone and mostly clustered around the island of Montreal. With the exceptions of Beauport–Limoilou in Quebec City and Trois-Rivières in central Quebec, where the Conservatives might also be a factor, the Liberals' primary opponents in these seats are Bloc incumbents. The polls have been good for the Liberals in Quebec lately. The party has 37 per cent support in the province, according to the Poll Tracker. Though there have been big variations in results — from 29 to 47 per cent in individual polls — more often than not, the Liberals have been closer to 40 per cent approval in Quebec. That's a new development. In four of the last eight polls, the Liberals registered support of 40 per cent or more in Quebec. They did that only four times in the previous 19 surveys. Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet might be playing defence in the next election to prevent the Liberals from winning some of the seats his party currently holds.(Sean Kilpatrick / Canadian Press) Yves-François Blanchet's Bloc Québécois, on the other hand, is polling at around 27 per cent, with most surveys putting the party below the 32.5 per cent they hit in 2019. The shifts between these two parties have been the only significant signs of movement in recent Quebec federal polling. The Conservatives and NDP have both been stable and consistent at around 17 and 10 per cent, respectively — largely unchanged from last time. The polls suggest that, since 2019, the Liberals have picked up about three points in Quebec, with the Bloc falling 5.5 points. When the Liberals score high in individual Quebec polls, the Bloc tends to poll lower. That suggests some movement going on between Liberal and Bloc voters. Liberals courting the Bloc vote So the Liberals' recent focus on Quebec makes political sense. In February, the Liberals brought forward proposals to reform the Official Languages Act to expand the right to work in French. Outside of Quebec, Heritage Minister (and Montreal MP) Steven Guilbeault has come under fire over Bill C-10, controversial legislation meant to bring web giants under the purview of the Broadcasting Act. In Quebec, however, the bill has broad support and received unanimous backing in the National Assembly. And when Premier François Legault's government brought forward Bill 96 — a piece of legislation aimed at protecting the French language that includes a proposal to change the Constitution to recognize Quebec as a nation and French as the language of that nation — Trudeau said that his government's initial legal analysis concluded the province could go ahead. The Liberals' electoral analysis, meanwhile, might also conclude that the New Democrats are no longer a major player in Quebec, the Greens have big but unrealistic ambitions in the province and the Conservative offer to Quebecers appears similar to the one voters rejected in 2019. To win a majority, the Liberals have to beat the Bloc at its own game. It is no easy feat to out-Quebec the Bloc. That doesn't mean the Trudeau Liberals aren't going to try.

N.B. COVID-19 roundup: 10 new cases, 60% of eligible residents partly vaccinated

Public Health is reporting 10 new cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick. This brings the active case total in the province to 143. Moncton region (Zone 1) 5 cases: A person under 19. A person between 20-29. A person between 40-49. Two people between 50-59. Three of the cases are close contacts of previously identified cases and two are under investigation. Fredericton region (Zone 3) 4 cases: A person between 20-29. A person between 40-49. Two people between 50-59. Two of the cases are close contacts of previously identified cases and two are under investigation. Bathurst region (Zone 6) 1 case: A person under 19. The case is related to travel. There have been 2,191 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the province throughout the pandemic with 2,004 recoveries and 43 deaths. Six people in the province are in hospital with COVID-19, with two in intensive care. There's also one case in hospital outside the province, also in intensive care. On Friday, 1,655 COVID-19 tests were conducted, bringing the pandemic testing total to 332,735. More than 60% receive first vaccine Nearly 61% of eligible New Brunswickers have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to Public Health. That's 422,227 New Brunswickers over the age of 12, or 60.9 per cent of the eligible population. It's an increase of 8,863 from Friday's tally. While more New Brunswickers are getting the jab, there are still appointments available at several vaccination clinics. Horizon Health tweeted on Saturday that it has appointments available at clinics next week in Pennfield, St. Stephen, Sussex, Woodstock, Oromocto and Grand Manan. On Saturday, Health Canada extended the expiry date of some AstraZenica vaccine by a month. Thousands of doses were set to expire on May 31, but Health Canada said a review of "stability data" prompted the change. Those doses will now have an expiry date of July 1. Around 2,700 of the vaccines originally set to expire at the end of May remain in New Brunswick, according to information provided by Public Health. New public exposures Public Health has also identified two new public exposures. Moncton region: Saint Pierre Catholic Church, 2000 Route 535, Cocagne, on Sunday, May 23, 11 a.m. service. Fredericton region: Capt. Submarine/Irving Oil, 305 Route 110, West Florenceville, on Thursday, May 20 between 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Previous public exposures Public Health previously reported the following potential public exposures: Moncton region: TD Bank, 525 Regis St., Dieppe, on May 22 between 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Moxie's Grill and Bar, 10 Wyse St., Moncton, on May 21 between 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Tim Hortons, 170 St. George Blvd., Moncton, on May 21 between 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. and May 23 between 8 a.m. and noon. A&W, 6 Champlain St., Dieppe, on May 21 between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Codiac Transpo City Bus #60, on May 21 between 7:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Codiac Transpo City Bus #51, on May 21 between 7:15 p.m. and 10 p.m. Subway, 100 Morton Ave., Moncton, on May 19 between 8:30 a.m. and 9:15 a.m. Extreme Windows, 80 Loftus St., Moncton, on May 18, May 19, May 20 and May 21 between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Fredericton region: Costco, 25 Wayne Squibb Blvd., on May 21, between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. The Head Shoppe, 1381 Regent St., Fredericton, on May 21 between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Dollarama, 1033 Prospect St., on May 21, between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Giant Tiger, 1160 Smythe St., on May 21 between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Atlantic Superstore, 116 Main St., Fredericton on Wednesday, May 19, between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Aldo Shoes, 1381 Regent St., on May 19, between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Le Château, 1381 Regent St., on May 19, between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Lawtons Drugs, 1381 Regent St., on May 19 and May 20, between 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Home Depot, 1450 Regent St., Fredericton, Wednesday, May 19, between 5 and 7 p.m. Fadi's Pizza, 312 Main St., Fredericton on Tuesday, May 18, between noon and 2 p.m. Fredericton Regional Centre, 300 St. Mary's St., on Tuesday, May 18, and Wednesday, May 19, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Petro Canada, 20 Royal Rd., Fredericton, on Tuesday, May 18, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Fredericton YMCA daycare, 570 York St., Fredericton, on Tuesday, May 18, and Wednesday, May 19 Scholten's, 325 Sunset Dr., Fredericton, on May 17 between 4 and 8 p.m. Walmart, 125 Two Nations Crossing, Fredericton on Monday, May 17, between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dollarama, 125 Two Nations Crossing, Fredericton on Monday, May 17, between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sobeys Fast Fuel, 530 Brookside Dr., Fredericton on Monday, May 17, between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Walmart Supercentre, 1399 Regent St., Fredericton on Sunday, May 16, between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Shoppers Drug Mart, 1040 Prospect St., Fredericton on Sunday, May 16, between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Christ Church (Parish) Church, 245 Westmorland St., Fredericton, Sunday, May 16, 10:30 a.m. service. Hope City Church, 429 Clements Dr., Fredericton, on Sunday, May 16, 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. services. Atlantic Superstore, 116 Main St., Fredericton, on May 16 between 9 and 11 a.m. Crowne Plaza Fredericton, 659 Queen St., Fredericton, on May 15 between 3 p.m. and May 16 at noon. Riverbend Golf Club, 541 Route 628, Durham Bridge,on May 15, between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Penniac Ultramar, 22 Route 628, on May 15, between 9 and 11 a.m. and between 2 and 4 p.m. Fredericton Boyce Farmers Market, 665 George St., on May 15 between 10 a.m. and noon Moores Clothing, 1150 Prospect St., on May 15, between 11 a.m. and noon. Home Depot, 1450 Regent St., on May 15, between noon and 1 p.m. Crowne Plaza Fredericton, 659 Queen St., between 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 15, and noon on Sunday, May 16. Costco, 25 Wayne Squibb Blvd., Fredericton on Saturday, May 15, between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Castle Building Supplies, 24B Columbus St., Perth-Andover, on May 14 between 7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., and May 20 between noon and 5:30 p.m. Arthurette General Store, 1450 Route 109, Red Rapids, on May 11 between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m., May 16 between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., and May 21 between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. Save Easy, A-24 Columbus St., Perth-Andover, on May 11, May 14, May 15, and May 21 between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. Edmundston region: Tim Hortons, 54 Canada St., Saint-Quentin, on May 16, between 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. Jean Coutu, 177 Victoria St., on May 15, between noon and 1 p.m. Bathurst region: Tim Hortons, 1420 Vanier Blvd., Bathurst, on May 16, between 5 and 7 p.m. What to do if you have a symptom People concerned they might have COVID-19 symptoms can take a self-assessment test online. Public Health says symptoms shown by people with COVID-19 have included: Fever above 38 C. New cough or worsening chronic cough. Sore throat. Runny nose. Headache. New onset of fatigue, muscle pain, diarrhea, loss of sense of taste or smell. Difficulty breathing. In children, symptoms have also included purple markings on the fingers and toes. People with one of those symptoms should: Stay at home. Call Tele-Care 811 or their doctor. Describe symptoms and travel history. Follow instructions.

Ontario principal removed after twice wearing hair of Black student like a wig

A school board in London, Ont., has removed a high school principal from his position after video surfaced on social media of him wearing the hair of a Black student as if it were a wig. A student who spoke to CBC News said the principal also wore the hair a second time six months after the first incident as part of a Halloween costume. The Conseil scolaire catholique Providence (CSC), the board that oversees francophone Catholic schools in southwestern Ontario, announced on Saturday that Luc Chartrand has been "immediately removed . from his current position." Chartrand was principal at Monseigneur-Bruyère, a French-language Catholic high school in north London. In an emailed statement that came in response to calls for comment from CBC News, CSC director general Joseph Picard said: "We strongly condemn this type of behaviour and maintain a zero-tolerance policy toward any racism, discrimination or the appearance thereof." Chartrand did not respond to a request for comment from CBC News. The move comes in response to two incidents that occurred in 2019, but they only came to light Friday evening when the London branch of Black Lives Matter posted a video on its Instagram account. The four-second video shows Chartrand during a school assembly that was being held as a fundraiser for a student who was battling cancer. Students were shaving their heads to support the student and to raise money for her. This still image shared Friday on Black Lives Matter London's Instagram page shows high school principal Luc Chartrand wearing hair recently shorn from a student as a wig. The school board announced Friday that Chartrand has been removed from his position.(Black Lives Matter London/Instagram) CBC News has spoken with two students who were in the gym that day and who verified the contents of the video. CBC News has agreed not to name the students for privacy reasons. One of the students whose hair was shorn that day is Black and had long dreadlocks. In the video, Chartrand is seen putting a clump of the shaved student's hair on his own head, and he then begins to flaunt for the crowd. A former student said Chartrand wore the hair at school a second time six months later, at Halloween, as part of a costume that included a basketball jersey in an apparent attempt to dress up like the student who had his hair shorn. The student plays basketball. A former student whom CBC News has agreed not to name for privacy reasons said the two incidents left many students at the school disgusted and offended. "It bothers me racially, because dreadlocks are so important to my culture," said the student, who is of Haitian descent. The student said it was inappropriate for Chartrand to keep the hair, only to wear it again at Halloween. The student who had cancer died in August of that year. ➫solutely wrong' Alexandra Kane, a spokesperson for Black Lives Matter London, said the video raises all kinds of red flags. "There are levels of cultural appropriation here," Kane said. "You can see he puts the hair on and he starts being ɻlack' with his body movements and his actions. It is absolutely wrong. Our clothes, our hair, our skin, is not a costume for you to wear and parade around." Kane said the student may have felt compelled to let Chartrand use the hair in this way, given that he was an authority figure. Alexandra Kane, a spokesperson for Black Lives Matter London, says a white principal wearing the hair of a Black student as part of a costume raises serious problems. 'There are levels of cultural appropriation here,' Kane said.(Andrew Lupton/CBC) "Even if the student gave permission for this to happen, it's not OK to put that kind of pressure on a student," she said. "It's not OK to say, 'I'm going to be you for Halloween' as a white man. It's like you're mocking him." Since posting the video, Kane said she's been contacted by current and former Monseigneur-Bruyère students. She said many are questioning why Chartrand's actions are only surfacing and being addressed by the board now, two years after the first incident in the gym. The student who confirmed the contents of the video also shared with CBC News a letter sent to the school board in June 2020 demanding changes at the school to create a better climate for Black students. The student said the letter was partly in response to Chartrand's actions the previous Halloween but also in response to other incidents at the school and the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer a month earlier. The student said she received no response from the board. Kane said she's heard similar stories from students who've spoken out since the photo of Chartrand was posted Friday. "The school board was aware of the situation when it happened," she said. "The students sent a petition to the school board and they did nothing. I hope they do more to eradicate racism in their own board. They need to find out where the problems are." 'I left for the same reasons' News of the principal's behaviour hit a nerve with Arielle Kayabaga, a London city councillor. She attended Monseigneur-Bruyère when she was in high school but transferred to another school before graduation over what she said was a climate of racism at the school. "I left for the same reasons. I just felt there was discriminations happening towards people of colour," she said. "The racism I experienced at that school made me want to switch schools, and that was 10 years ago. "The students there now are experiencing the same thing. It's not just about the principal." Arielle Kayabaga, a London city councillor, attended Monseigneur-Bruyère in high school, but said she transferred to another school before graduating due to what she called a climate of racism at the school.(Andrew Lupton/CBC)

N.S. refused to pay for RCMP team created to respond to mass shootings inquiry

The Nova Scotia government twice refused to pay for a special RCMP team established to respond to the public inquiry into the mass shootings that killed 22 people in April 2020, newly released documents show. CBC News obtained correspondence between Mark Furey, who was the province's justice minister at the time, and Assistant Commissioner Lee Bergerman, the commanding officer of the RCMP in Nova Scotia, through freedom of information laws. The records show that in the summer and fall of 2020, Bergerman wrote to Furey asking for financial support to help pay for an "issues management team" being set up in the wake of the mass shootings. "As you may appreciate, public perception of the province fully funding the RCMP to respond to inquiry demands would not be favourable," Furey wrote in a Dec. 11 letter to Bergerman. In April 2020, a gunman disguised as a Mountie killed neighbours, acquaintances and strangers, including a pregnant woman and an RCMP officer. He travelled nearly 200 kilometres through rural Nova Scotia before being shot and killed by police at a gas station in Enfield, N.S., about 13 hours after the violence started in Portapique, N.S. Twenty-two people died on April 18 and 19. Top row from left: Gina Goulet, Dawn Gulenchyn, Jolene Oliver, Frank Gulenchyn, Sean McLeod, Alanna Jenkins. Second row: John Zahl, Lisa McCully, Joey Webber, Heidi Stevenson, Heather Oɻrien and Jamie Blair. Third row from top: Kristen Beaton, Lillian Campbell, Joanne Thomas, Peter Bond, Tom Bagley and Greg Blair. Bottom row: Emily Tuck, Joy Bond, Corrie Ellison and Aaron Tuck. (CBC) Work on a joint federal and provincial inquiry is now underway. The mass casualty commission is examining the cause, context and circumstances of the massacre, including how police and various federal and provincial agencies responded. The RCMP has set up a team of officers, headed by Chief Supt. John Robin, tasked with collecting and passing along information required by the commission, said Cpl. Chris Marshall in a statement. He said part of the team's role will involve supporting members of the RCMP who are called as witnesses. "The third objective is to identify areas within the police response to this tragedy that may require further examination and possible action by the RCMP, whether from a training, policy, procedural, resourcing or equipment perspective. All of these objectives are a work in progress," Marshall said. 2 team members married to top Mounties Robin is married to the head of the Halifax District RCMP, Janis Gray. Another member of the team is Bergerman's husband, Mike Butcher, a retired RCMP officer who is now contracted by the force. Both connections were first reported by Frank Magazine. Butcher also spent 5½ years working for the provincial police in British Columbia, and has been contracted as a public servant by the RCMP since 2009, said Cpl. Lisa Croteau. "He was seconded from the B.C. RCMP to the Nova Scotia RCMP project team in May 2021 because of his expertise in disclosure and policing," said Croteau in a statement. The provincial Justice Department confirmed Thursday to CBC News that the province has not committed any funding for the team. The Mounties said it is paid for jointly by the Nova Scotia RCMP and RCMP headquarters. Mark Furey, Nova Scotia's former justice minister, is shown on Jan 21, 2020. He announced the following month that he would not reoffer in the next provincial election.(Craig Paisley/CBC) The records obtained by CBC News show that initially Bergerman hoped the province would help pay for the additional staff. Over the summer, she sent a business case to Furey laying out the plans. But Furey felt the July 21 request veered too closely to asking for help paying for additional legal services. After seeking his own legal advice, Furey wrote to Bergerman that he determined there was "no contractual obligation for the province to financially support this proposal" given it already contributes to such services, according to an Oct. 28 letter. He advised Bergerman that should the team go ahead, "costs must be absorbed within your existing funding." Collecting documents for inquiry When Bergerman responded Dec. 1, the commanding officer disputed that the issues management team would be providing any legal services. She said the plan was for it to be made up of three RCMP officers, including a senior commissioned officer, and two public servants who would help organize information on the mass shooting investigation and documentation for the public inquiry, and liaise with the federal Department of Justice. This did not sway Furey. He declined, for a second time, to provide any funding in his Dec. 11 response. Marshall said since Bergerman's requests, the name of the issues management team was changed to the "RCMP project team responsible for the response to the mass casualty commission" and that the number of people working with it in Ottawa and Nova Scotia will fluctuate depending on the workload. Questions about independence Robin, the leader of the new RCMP team, prompted the commission to reiterate in early May that it is independent and that no Mounties are working for the public inquiry itself. The chief superintendent was handing business cards listing his role as being with the mass casualty commission to some people who were impacted by the mass shootings. In response, Emily Hill, a lawyer who works for the commission, issued a public statement clarifying that its role included "reviewing the RCMP's activities with respect to the mass casualty events and their aftermath." "We do not take any instructions from the RCMP. We are asking the RCMP to remove the card to avoid further confusion," Hill's statement said. A memorial pays tribute to RCMP Const. Heidi Stevenson, a 23-year member of the force and mother of two, along the highway in Shubenacadie, N.S., on April 21, 2020. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press) Marshall told CBC News at the time that Robin's business cards were being reprinted. Croteau said Robin is also conducting an internal workplace safety investigation and was talking to community members as part of that. Families calling for answers Work on the commission examining the mass shootings started last fall and public hearings are expected to be held this coming fall, though no dates have been set. The inquiry came about after family members of the victims called for answers about how such a tragedy could occur. Many families have been critical of the amount of information the RCMP has shared with them and with the public. There was immense public outcry last July when the federal government announced it was launching an independent review. Within days, the public safety minister announced a public inquiry would go ahead after all. Unlike a review, a public inquiry has the power to summon witnesses and require them to give evidence under oath. Paid millions extra for RCMP in 2020 Bergerman's requests for funding for the team responding to the public inquiry were not the only letters she sent to the provincial government asking for financial help. Nova Scotia contracts the RCMP for policing in many rural areas and under the provincial funding agreement, the minister of justice has the ability to approve additional spending in emergencies. Shortly after the mass shootings and through the summer, Furey agreed to pay for out-of-province officers to fill in for the 70 Mounties who took leave. In all, he approved $3.7 million to cover costs associated with bringing in those officers, but he declined to continue to approve the extra spending beyond the end of August. He also approved spending an additional $5.1 million on policing during the fisheries dispute in southwestern Nova Scotia between Oct. 14, 2020, and Dec. 19, 2020. Furey, a former RCMP officer, left his post as justice minister in February after announcing he wouldn't be reoffering in the next election. MORE TOP STORIES

Tropical oasis in N.B.? Nope — just remnants of Minto's mining history

Turquoise pools of water that look like they could be featured in a travel brochure promoting a tropical getaway aren't a ruse to get tourists: they're simply a reminder of a rural New Brunswick village's history. Hidden from the general public, the blue-green glow of the pools catches the attention of anyone riding a mountain bike or driving an ATV on the trails just outside Minto. But this isn't a classified tropical oasis. It's a remnant of the coal mining that was once a prominent industry in the area. "It goes back hundreds of years," said Greg Smith, a village councillor and newly elected deputy mayor of Minto. Smith worked in the industry for more than 20 years as a maintenance supervisor until the coal mining stopped in the area in 2010. Part of his job was to dig the cavities in the ground to extract the coal. Greg Smith worked in the coal mining industry for more than 20 years. (Shane Fowler/CBC) Once the work was finished, the holes naturally filled up with water, leaving dozens of ponds behind on the wooded property. "Every one of these bodies of water are man-made — there's hardly any natural ones here," he said, adding that some of the ponds are more than 30 metres deep. The colours of the more picturesque ponds range from sharp green to baby blue. Allison Enright, an assistant professor of aqueous and environmental geochemistry at the University of New Brunswick, has studied the water at the former coal-mining site. The turquoise water has become a favorite backdrop for pictures. (Gary Moore/CBC) She said there are tiny sediment particles in the water, remains from the mining activity and invisible to the naked eye. "They tend to stay floating or suspended within the water of the lake, and then this interacts with the light on the surface and in the water body to give you this really bright blue colour," she explained. As for why some of the ponds are a different colour blue, Enright said it just depends how much sediment is in each body of water. Despite the peculiar hues, she said, it's not dangerous. "In this area, over several decades of efforts to remediate, the pH of this water has been made completely safe," she said. As far as swimming goes, Enright said it's safe to do so, but it may not be a pleasant experience. "I don't think it would smell very good, I don't think it would taste very good, and you might come out kind of chalky and then really want to shower." Some of the water looks a deeper turquoise than others, depending on the amount of sediment in each pond. (Shane Fowler/CBC) Enright said wildlife, including fish, ducks and geese, are now thriving in and around the ponds. Greg Smith said the water is a reminder of the community's connection to the mining industry, and provides a scenic backdrop for the popular network of mountain bike and ATV trails built on the land. "It's quite an attraction for people. These are all just like little lakes, they're small little lakes you know. And they change colour all the time, they're beautiful."

Colombia's president deploys military to protest-hit city

BUCARAMANGA, Colombia (AP) — Colombian President Iván Duque on Friday announced the deployment of military forces to the city of Cali after at least three people died in increasingly violent protests and talks to end the social uprising stalled. Duque repeated his assertion that the protests, which have been raging for a month, are infiltrated by illegal armed groups and promised to deploy "all intelligence capabilities” to demonstrate this. “This deployment will almost triple our capacity throughout the province in less than 24 hours, ensuring assistance in nerve centers where we have seen acts of vandalism, violence and low-intensity urban terrorism,” said the president, speaking from Cali, the city in southwest Colombia that has become the epicenter of the nationwide antigovernment protests. The deployment comes after Attorney General Francisco Barbosa said an agent with the his institution was allegedly killed by civilians after opening fire. “According to the information collected so far, he shot several people causing the death of civilians . then he ended up dead at the hands of people at the scene,” Barbosa said in a statement. José Miguel Vivanco, director of the Americas Division of Human Rights Watch, urged Duque to prohibit the use of firearms by state agents and said the organization had corroborated videos from Cali showing armed men in civilian clothing shooting. Juliette de Rivero, representative in Colombia of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, called for an end to violence, also citing cases of “civilians shooting” in Cali. Protests were held Friday in to other parts of Colombia as the country marked a month since the start of the largest protests here in decades. More than 40 people have been killed and 2,200 civilians and police injured. The protests erupted when Duque proposed a wide-ranging tax increase, but continued even after he backed off, transformed into a general outcry against growing poverty and inequality in a country where the unemployment rate doubled over the past year of pandemic. The government and the National Strike Committee have not been able to establish the conditions to open negotiations. The protesters are demanding the government guarantee the right to social protest while Duque's administration won't budge from its demand that road blockades that have created widespread shortages be lifted. “What we are seeing is a delaying action by the government which does not understand the complexity of the moment," said Francisco Maltés, president of the Central Workers Union, who blamed the Duque government for not signing a guarantee agreement and not responding to requests for a date to start talks. Sandra Borda, an analyst and expert on protests, said there is a crisis of representativeness in both the government, which has limited room for maneuver, and the National Strike Committee, which does not represent all the sectors that are demonstrating. “We are facing a scenario that I do not think will be resolved soon, because the only thing the government can control with any level of effectiveness are state forces and therefore it continues to try to resolve the situation with a heavy hand. When the state forces are excessive there is more indignation, more anger and more fuel is added to the fire of the demonstrations,” she said. Astrid Suárez, The Associated Press


12. Stranger Things

Having shows set in the 80's is popular right now. almost as popular as having milk on the table. This just goes to show how timeless milk is since families are still pairing it with meals today! In this episode of Stranger Things, they are enjoying milk at dinner.

Now lets take a look back at some past Emmy winners and nominees that held an award in one hand and a dairy treat in the other.


Founding Edit

Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield were childhood friends from Merrick, New York. [3] Although Greenfield finished college, he found himself unable to make his way into medical school. Cohen dropped out of school. [4] In 1977, Cohen and Greenfield completed a correspondence course on ice cream making from Pennsylvania State University's creamery. Cohen has severe anosmia, a lack of a sense of smell or taste, and so relied on "mouth feel" and texture to provide variety in his diet. This led to the company's trademark chunks being mixed in with their ice cream. [4] On May 5, 1978, with a $12,000 [4] investment (equivalent to $48,000 in 2020), the two business partners opened an ice cream parlor in a renovated gas station in downtown Burlington, Vermont. In 1979, they marked their anniversary by holding the first "free cone day", now an annual event at every Ben & Jerry's store. [4]

In 1980, they rented space in an old spool and bobbin mill on South Champlain Street in Burlington and started packing their ice cream in pints. In 1981, the first Ben & Jerry's franchise opened on Route 7 in Shelburne, Vermont. In 1983, Ben & Jerry's ice cream was used to build "the world's largest ice cream sundae" in St. Albans, Vermont the sundae weighed 27,102 pounds (12,293 kg). That same year, the cows on their cartons were redesigned by local artist Woody Jackson. [5]

In 1984, Häagen-Dazs wanted to limit distribution of Ben & Jerry's in Boston, prompting Ben & Jerry's to file suit against the parent company, Pillsbury, in its now famous "What's the Doughboy Afraid Of?" campaign. [6] In 1987, Häagen-Dazs again tried to enforce exclusive distribution, and Ben & Jerry's filed its second lawsuit against the Pillsbury Company.

In 1985, the Ben & Jerry's Foundation was established at the end of the year with a gift from Ben & Jerry's to fund community-oriented projects it was then provided with 7.5% of the company's annual pre-tax profits. In 1986, Ben & Jerry's launched its "Cowmobile", a modified mobile home used to distribute free scoops of Ben & Jerry's ice cream in a unique, cross-country "marketing drive"—driven and served by Ben and Jerry themselves. The "Cowmobile" burned to the ground outside of Cleveland four months later, but there were no injuries. Ben said it looked like "the world's largest baked Alaska". [7] In 1987, as a tribute to guitarist Jerry Garcia & Grateful Dead fans everywhere, Ben & Jerry's presented its first ice cream named for a rock legend and the most famous of fan-suggested flavors, "Cherry Garcia". [8] In 1988, the two men won the title of U.S. Small Business Persons of the Year, awarded by U.S. President Ronald Reagan. [9] Also that year, the first brownies were ordered from Greyston Bakery, which led to the development of the popular Chocolate Fudge Brownie flavor. [10] In 1992, Ben & Jerry's joined in a co-operative campaign with the national non-profit Children's Defense Fund the campaign goal was to bring children's basic needs to the top of the national agenda. Over 70,000 postcards were sent to Congress concerning kids and other national issues. In 1995, they hired Robert Holland, Jr. as CEO after holding a "Yo! I'm your C.E.O." essay contest as part of the search. [11] Holland left after 20 months following philosophical differences and was replaced by Perry Odak in 1997. [12]

In 1989, Ben & Jerry's revealed their opposition to the use of rBGH (recombinant bovine growth hormone) in all their products. This genetically engineered hormone is sometimes given to cows to boost milk production, but Ben & Jerry's does not support this practice and is in favor of using less chemically intensive ingredients for the safety of consumers and the environment. [13]

In 1994, Ben & Jerry's: The Inside Scoop, written by Fred "Chico" Lager, former CEO of Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream, was published. The book tracks the history of how Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream got started. The book focuses on "How Two Real Guys Built a Business with a Social Conscience and a Sense of Humor." [14]

Unilever era Edit

In April 2000, Ben & Jerry's sold the company to Anglo-Dutch multinational food giant Unilever. [15] Unilever said it hoped to carry on the tradition of engaging "in these critical, global economic and social missions". Although the founders' names are still attached to the product, they do not hold any board or management position and are not involved in day-to-day management of the company. [16]

In 2001, Ben & Jerry's U.S. completed the transition to "Eco-Pint" packaging, which packaged all pint flavors in environmentally friendly unbleached paperboard Eco-Pint containers, a decision it later reversed. The use of brown-kraft unbleached paperboard had been a critical first step toward a totally biodegradable pint made without added chlorine. Due to what they described as increasing supply, quality, and cost challenges, Ben & Jerry's discontinued their use of the Eco-Pint in 2006, transitioning to a pint container made out of a bleached paperboard that it said was more readily available. [17]

On Earth Day in 2005, when a vote in the U.S. Senate proposed the opening of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling, Ben & Jerry's launched a protest by creating the largest ever Baked Alaska, which weighed 900 pounds (410 kg), and placed it in front of the U.S. Capitol Building. [18] [19]

In March 2009, "CyClone Dairy" [20] launched an advertising campaign and a website to promote its milk products, which purportedly came exclusively from cloned cows. [21] On April 1, 2009 (April Fool's Day), Ben & Jerry's announced that it was behind this fake company. Ben & Jerry's had created the tongue-in-cheek hoax to raise awareness of the increasing presence of products from cloned animals within American food [22] and to campaign for a tracking system of cloned-animal products. [23] The hoax was revealed on April Fool's Day with the message: "We believe you should have the right to choose which foods you eat – and not to eat cloned foods if you don't want to. And that's why Ben & Jerry's believes we need a national clone tracking system, so people and companies can know where their food is coming from." [24]

In 2010, Jostein Solheim, a Unilever executive from Norway, became the new CEO of the company and had this to say about the transition: "My mantra that I've repeated a hundred times since starting at Ben & Jerry's is: 'Change is a wonderful thing,'" he said. "The world needs dramatic change to address the social and environmental challenges we are facing. Values-led businesses can play a critical role in driving that positive change. We need to lead by example, and prove to the world that this is the best way to run a business. Historically, this company has been and must continue to be a pioneer to continually challenge how business can be a force for good and address inequities inherent in global business." [25]

In 2013, Ben & Jerry's committed to making their products GMO-free in support of mandatory GMO labeling legislation. [26]

In 2018, Matthew McCarthy, previously a Unilever executive, replaced Jostein Solheim and became the new CEO of the company. "We are delighted to welcome Matthew, who brings a wealth of commercial experience, along with rock-solid values and a courageous vision for the role businesses can and should play in the world," said Ben & Jerry's board of directors Chairperson, Anuradha Mittal. [2]

Ben & Jerry's has production facilities in the following locations:

There was an official survey taken among the general public to find out the best Ben and Jerrys flavour. Cookie dough was the winner with 60% and in last place was chocolate chip brownie with 8.5%. The "Vermonster" is a large ice cream sundae served in a "Vermonster Bucket" in Ben & Jerry's "scoop shops." Its ingredients are 20 scoops of ice cream, 4 bananas, 4 ladles of hot fudge, 3 chocolate chip cookies, 1 chocolate fudge brownie, 10 scoops of walnuts, 2 scoops each of any 4 toppings, and whipped cream. It contains 14,000 calories (59,000 kJ), and 500 grams (18 oz) of fat. Since 2009, the Vermonster Challenge is an annual charity event held by Ben & Jerry's in which teams of four compete to finish a Vermonster and win free ice cream for a year.

"Chubby Hubby" consists of vanilla malt ice cream swirled with fudge and peanut butter, and containing pretzel nuggets covered in fudge and filled with peanut butter. During the month of September 2009, Ben and Jerry's, in partnership with Freedom to Marry, renamed "Chubby Hubby" to "Hubby Hubby," in celebration of the legalization of same-sex marriage in the company's home state of Vermont. The carton featured the image of two men in tuxedos getting married beneath a rainbow. [30] [31] [32]

On March 13, 2012, Ben & Jerry's announced it would be changing the name of one of its ice cream flavors in the UK in support of equal marriage rights for same-sex couples. "Oh! My! Apple Pie!" would become "Apple-y Ever After" and tubs would feature a gay couple atop a wedding cake decorated with rainbows. [33]

"Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough" was temporarily renamed "I Dough, I Dough" in the United States during the summer of 2015. This was in celebration of United States Supreme Court's ruling in support of same-sex marriage. The proceeds from sales were to go to the Human Rights Campaign (a nonprofit advocacy group for LGBT rights). [34]

Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield appeared on The Colbert Report on March 5, 2007, to promote their new ice cream flavor, "Stephen Colbert's AmeriCone Dream", and Cohen's progressive advocacy group TrueMajority.

The company renamed a flavor, "Yes Pecan!", in reference to Barack Obama's victory in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. They decided in January 2009 to donate all proceeds made on the sale of that flavor to the Common Cause Education Fund. [35]

On March 2, 2011, Cohen and Greenfield appeared on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and unveiled their new flavor of ice cream, "Late Night Snack", whose carton features a picture of Jimmy Fallon on it. [36]

On February 24, 2012, Ben & Jerry's released a new Greek Frozen Yogurt line, which came in several flavors: "Strawberry Shortcake", "Blueberry Vanilla Graham", "Raspberry Fudge Chunk", "Banana Peanut Butter", [37] and "Vanilla" (scoop shop exclusive): [38] On April 12, 2013, "Pineapple Passionfruit", "Vanilla Honey Caramel", and "Liz Lemon" were added to the Greek Yogurt line. [39] The Liz Lemon flavor was inspired by a character of the same name created by actress Tina Fey as the main character on the NBC television sitcom 30 Rock. [40]

On February 17, 2015, Cohen and Greenfield appeared on The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon and unveiled their new flavor of ice cream, "The Tonight Dough", with all of its proceeds going to the SeriousFun Children's Network that supports camps for children with major illnesses. [41]

In 2015, Charoset flavored ice cream became widely available in time for the Passover holiday. [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47]

In April 2015, the company confirmed that it was working on vegan options, after hearing consumers' feedback, led by a petition and FARM organization. [48] In early February 2016, the company announced a new all-vegan line with four flavors. Two of these are versions of existing flavors – "Chunky Monkey" and "Chocolate Fudge Brownie" – and two are all-new vegan-only flavors: "Coffee Caramel Fudge" and "Peanut Butter & Cookies". [49]

In February 2017, three new non-dairy flavors were added: Caramel Almond Brittle, Cherry Garcia, and Coconut Seven Layer Bar. [50]

In January 2018, the company added two new non-dairy flavors to its growing line of vegan options. Peanut Butter Half Baked features chocolate and peanut butter with fudge brownies and pieces of peanut butter cookie dough, while Cinnamon Buns is made with cinnamon-spiced ice cream and features cinnamon bun dough and a cinnamon streusel swirl. [51] Ben and Jerry's non-dairy line also features flavors such as PB & Cookies, Chocolate Fudge Brownie, and Caramel Coffee fudge. Among their newest non-dairy flavors are the following: chocolate caramel cluster, chocolate chip cookie dough, and chocolate salted n' swirled. [52] Ben & Jerry's also just released new snack-able "cookie dough chunks" that have a vegan option for the non-dairy connoisseur. [53] They continue to take new non-dairy flavor suggestions on their website. [54]

In October 2018, Ben and Jerry's launched a campaign for a limited-edition ice cream flavor that also held a political message focusing on resisting the US's current governmental administration under Trump. The campaign debuted the new flavor, ‘Pecan Resist’ and included new packaging that advertised their messages. The company donated $25,000 to four organizations that supported their interests towards progress with societal issues including inclusivity, justice for people of color, women, refugees, the LGBTQ community, and issues of climate change. [55]

Free Cone Day is an annual event held between late March and early May, in which Ben & Jerry's scoop shops give out free ice cream cups and cones. Free Cone Day was first held on Saturday, May 5, 1979, by Ben and Jerry as a customer and staff appreciation event for the first anniversary of their store's opening. However, since 2020 caused by COVID-19 pandemic, that went on hiatus.

Every year over one million cones are given away, prompting the company's ad slogan "Be One In A Million." Charitable organizations are often present at the stores each year and enjoy a significant amount of fundraising success. Often, local celebrities show up at various stores, promoting the day and the charities there. [56] Sometimes the event is scheduled to coincide with Earth Day and sometimes volunteers are on hand with clipboards and voter registration forms to help those who would like to register to vote (in those countries where that is necessary).

Commercial Edit

The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer-advocacy group, urged Ben & Jerry's to stop labeling their ice cream as "all natural" due to the company's use of corn syrup, alkalised cocoa, and other chemically modified ingredients. [57] In September 2010, the company agreed to stop labeling their ice cream and frozen yogurt as "all natural". [58]

In 2011, [59] Ben & Jerry's released a flavor named Schweddy Balls, in homage to the Saturday Night Live (SNL) skit of the same name. This received protest from One Million Moms, a project of the conservative Christian group American Family Associated, who said that the name was too explicit for grocery store shelves. Spokesperson Monica Cole explained to the media: "I realize it could be a lot worse, but are they going to progressively get worse if we don't say something? Maybe they'll think twice before they come up with another inappropriate name for ice cream." However, the expression of disdain was not unanimous among U.S. parents, as mother Gina Ragusa said to The Huffington Post: "We just think it's funny, that's all, and honestly we all really want to try it", adding that she consistently checks for the item's availability at her local supermarket. [60] Actor Alec Baldwin, who appeared in the SNL skit as baker Pete Schweddy, hosted the September 24, 2011, episode of the 37th season of the show and responded to the protests by stating that a new flavor called "Go Fudge Yourself" had been produced for those in opposition to the tribute. Following the initial release of the flavor, Baldwin informed the media that "thanks to Ben & Jerry's, the goodness of the Schweddy family recipe won't go with me to the great beyond," as he had previously feared that his association with the SNL episode would remain permanent until his death. [61]

Political Edit

Following rumors that suggested Ben & Jerry's supported the defense of Mumia Abu-Jamal—who was convicted in 1982 of killing Philadelphia Police officer Daniel Faulkner [62] —the company confirmed that Cohen did sign a petition, as a private citizen, asking that "the system of American justice be followed fully in the case". [63]

Between 2005 and 2008, Ben and Jerry's collaborated with polar explorer Marc Cornelissen and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) to run the Climate Change College, an initiative to train young people in communications and campaigning around climate change. [64] [65]

Controversy emerged in 2006 after the company released a flavor of ice cream called "Black and Tan". It had named the flavor after the alcoholic drink, which is made by mixing stout with pale ale, but the "Black and Tans" are also known as a paramilitary police force of British World War I veterans recruited during the Irish Revolution. At the time that the flavor was released, the Irish Republican movement was still offended by the historical association of the title. [66]

In 2012, Vermonters for a Just Peace in Palestine/Israel (VTJP) [67] contacted Ben Cohen, Jerry Greenfield and the CEO of Ben & Jerry's after learning that ice cream produced by Ben & Jerry's franchise in Israel [68] was being sold in Israeli settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. Leafleting occurred at locations in Vermont, New York and California on 'Free Cone Day' in April 2013 [69] and April 2014. [70] As of November 2014 [update] , 232 organizations across the United States and in seventeen countries worldwide have signed a letter written by VTJP calling on Ben & Jerry's to end its commercial ties to such settlements. [71]

In late April 2014, Ben & Jerry's signed onto the "Fight for the Reef" campaign, a partnership between the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)-Australia and the Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS). Premier Campbell Newman and Queensland state senator Matt Canavan both said in statements that Ben & Jerry's was making misleading statements that exaggerated the detrimental impact that proposed government programs would have on the Great Barrier Reef, [72] and Environment Minister Andrew Powell said that "The only people taking a scoop out of the reef is Ben and Jerry's and Unilever. If you understand the facts, you'd want to be boycotting Ben and Jerry's". Australian Ben & Jerry's brand manager Kalli Swaik responded that "Ben & Jerry's believes that dredging and dumping in world heritage waters surrounding the marine park area will be detrimental to the reef ecology. It threatens the health of one of Australia's most iconic treasures." [73]

In February 2016, Ben & Jerry's co-founder Ben Cohen created an ice cream flavor called "Bernie's Yearning" in support of U.S Senator Bernie Sanders' run for president in the 2016 Democratic Primaries against Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The flavor consisted of plain mint ice cream covered by a solid layer of mint chocolate. According to Cohen, "The chocolate disk represents the huge majority of economic gains that have gone to the top 1 percent since the end of the recession. Beneath it, the rest of us." [74] This was done in an effort to showcase the United States' current socioeconomic issues.

In April 2016, Ben & Jerry's cofounders, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, were both arrested at the Democracy Awakening protests on the U.S. Capitol steps in Washington, D.C. [75]

In May 2017, Ben and Jerry's announced they would not serve two scoops of the same ice cream flavor in Australia, due to the refusal of the Australian government to legalize same-sex marriage. They said this would encourage "fans to contact their MP's to tell them the time has come-make marriage equality legal!". This stance, they said, would continue for however long it took for same-sex marriage to be legalized. [76]

In June 2018, Ben & Jerry's announced their support for some 9,000 Afghan asylum seekers' right to stay in Sweden, drawing heavy criticism from some [ who? ] commentators. [77] [78]

On October 30, 2018, they announced their new limited batch flavor called "Pecan Resist". [79] It was introduced as a part of the opposition campaign against President Donald Trump. It was marketed as "a campaign to lick injustice and champion those fighting to create a more just and equitable nation of us all". [79] [80]

In August 2019, they produced another Bernie Sanders flavor called "Bernie's Back." [81] It was not for sale in stores, but was awarded as a prize to 40 contest winners. Ben Cohen endorsed Bernie Sanders for President.

In 2020, Ben & Jerry's announced that it plans to join the "#StopHateForProfit" campaign, halting paid advertising on Facebook and Instagram in the U.S. The company said it was asking Facebook "to take the clear and unequivocal actions called for by the campaign to stop its platform from being used to spread and amplify racism and hate." [82]

In August 2020, Ben & Jerry's attracted criticism from several British commentators and government officials for defending the channel crossings of migrants from France, which had started after a tweet sent to Home Secretary Priti Patel, calling for their treatment as asylum seekers. [83] Additionally, the company claimed people cannot be illegal, even when entering a country for economic reasons with the crossings coming from the developed First World country of France. With these points of contention being voiced by some. [84] Minister James Cleverly also criticized the statements from the company as being statistically inaccurate and described them as 'virtue signalling.' [85] Spiked considered the statements hypocritical due to the company's own practices in relation to worker's rights and pay. The publication also alleged the hiring of illegal immigrants in which they were said to be treated with poor working conditions, 12 to 14-hour days and a barely minimum wage pay rate. [86]

In January 2021, Ben & Jerry's released a Tweet calling for the resignation, impeachment, and invoking of the 25th Amendment against U.S. President Donald Trump following the storming of the United States Capitol, saying “Yesterday was not a protest—it was a riot to uphold white supremacy.” [87]

Social Edit

In February 2012, a Ben & Jerry's franchise near Harvard University created a limited edition frozen yogurt flavor named "Taste the Lin-Sanity" in honor of Asian-American basketball player Jeremy Lin, a Harvard alumnus. At inception, the product contained vanilla frozen yogurt, lychee honey swirls, and fortune cookie pieces, leading to a widely publicized controversy about racial stereotyping due to the association of the fortune cookie ingredient with Chinese culture. The latter ingredient was later replaced with waffle cookies, [88] as the fortune cookies became soggy and the franchise received returns from customers. Ben & Jerry's general manager for Boston and Cambridge explained to the media: "we obviously weren't looking to offend anybody and the majority of the feedback about it has been positive." [89] Ben & Jerry's released an official statement shortly after the launch of the product apologizing to those who were offended. [90]

In September 2014, anti-hazing activists raised concerns about the ice cream flavor "Hazed & Confused", which had been released earlier that year. The concern was that the name could be perceived as belittling of hazing and bullying problems. The company has noted that the name was based on the word hazelnut and a play on the phrase "dazed and confused", which is both a song popularized by Led Zeppelin and a 1993 film. [91] The decision was made in October to not rename the flavor. [92]

Attempts by migrant laborers to directly contact company Ben & Jerry's officials in Waterbury, Vermont, during 2018 resulted in arrests by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "Zero" farms are reported to be in compliance with the Milk With Dignity Code of Conduct, according to Will Lambek of Migrant Justice. [93]

During the 2020 protests against racial prejudice following the police killing of George Floyd, Ben & Jerry's publicized a statement encouraging Americans to "dismantle white supremacy" and face "the sins of our past." [94]

Product safety Edit

The Organic Consumers Association announced in July 2017 that it found traces of the herbicide glyphosate in 10 of 11 samples of the company's ice creams. [95] The traces were found to be at levels below the ceiling set by the Environmental Protection Agency for environmental contamination.


The company renamed a flavor, Yes Pecan!, in reference to Barack Obama's victory in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election. They later decided in January 2009 to donate all proceeds made on the sale of that flavor to the Common Cause Education Fund. [14]

On February 17, 2015, in honor of the one-year anniversary of the premiere of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Ben & Jerry's unveiled The Tonight Dough Starring Jimmy Fallon. [15] All of its proceeds go to the SeriousFun Children's Network, which supports camps for children with major illnesses. [16]


Watch the video: Jimmy Announces Ben u0026 Jerrys The Tonight Dough Non-Dairy and Chunks. The Tonight Show (December 2021).