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Bread and butter pudding with marmalade recipe

Bread and butter pudding with marmalade recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Dessert
  • Puddings
  • Bread and butter pudding

For this easy to make bread and butter pudding the bread slices are spread with butter and marmalade.


Somerset, England, UK

26 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 5 slices white bread
  • butter or margarine, to taste
  • marmalade, to taste
  • 100g sultanas
  • 300ml (1/2 pt) milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 100g caster sugar

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:45min ›Extra time:1hr soaking › Ready in:1hr55min

  1. Butter the bread and spread the marmalade onto it. Cut the slices in half. Butter a baking dish and layer the slices, putting the sultanas between each layer. Put to one side.
  2. Add the milk, eggs and sugar to a saucepan and gently heat but not boil, whisking as you go until well combined.
  3. Pour onto prepared bread and leave to soak for about 1 hour.
  4. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas 4.
  5. Bake until golden, about 45 minutes.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)

Reviews in English (1)

Seconds please!-06 Nov 2017


Marmalade Bread and Butter Pudding

Sometimes the 'poor man's pudding' can be the most comforting and that is certainly true of bread and butter pudding. Different forms have been around for centuries and made to use up stale bread. Maybe it should have been called bread and bone pudding though, as the earliest bread pudding was called 'whitepot' and used bone marrow instead of butter.

Today, bread and butter pudding is made as a treat whether or not the bread needs using up, and you can jazz a traditional recipe up in all sorts of ways. In this case, using marmalade.

Preparation Time : 40 minutes (including soaking time)
Cooking Time : 45 minutes
Makes : 6 servings

Ingredients
6 slices of thick white bread
3 tbsp butter
3 tbsp of homemade marmalade (or shop bought)
500ml almond milk
3 eggs
1 tbsp Truvia sweetener (or 50g caster sugar)
2 tbsp demerara sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract


The Method

Use some of the butter to grease the inside of the inner pot. With the rest, butter both sides of the bread and tear in to small chunks.

Add half the bread, followed by half the sultanas and cinnamon. Repeat this step so you have a second layer.

In a bowl, whisk the eggs and sugar until thick and creamy. Gradually whisk in the milk then add the vanilla essence.

Pour the milk mixture over the bread. Put the lid on and close the pressure valve then select the STEW/SOUP function and adjust the time to 15 minutes.

When the program has finished press CANCEL. For this recipe we recommend the QUICK RELEASE method before opening the pressure valve and removing the lid.


Recipe Summary

  • 8 slices stale bread
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • ½ cup dried currants
  • 1 ¾ cups milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 pinch ground nutmeg

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a 9-inch round pie dish or cake pan.

Butter the bread on both sides and cut into triangles. Arrange a single layer of buttered bread in the bottom of the greased pan, slightly overlapping the triangles. Sprinkle with 1/2 of the sugar and all of the currants. Arrange the remaining bread on top, then sprinkle with remaining sugar.

Beat milk, eggs, and nutmeg together. Pour over the bread and press down firmly to compress the pudding and help the bread absorb the milk mixture.

Bake in the preheated oven until golden brown and set, about 30 minutes.


Orange Marmalade Bread and Butter Pudding

When you first read this recipe, you may have doubts: it seems like a lot of bread in way too much liquid. But what emerges after baking is a puffy, golden pudding that melts in your mouth. This comforting dessert is gilded with a thin layer of tangy orange marmalade.

Orange Marmalade Bread and Butter Pudding

1 loaf (1 lb./500 g.) challah or brioche, ends trimmed and cut into 12 slices

3 Tbs. unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 3/4 cups (14 fl. oz./430 ml.) whole milk

1 cup (8 fl. oz./250 ml.) heavy cream

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

1/2 cup (5 oz./155 g.) orange marmalade

Whipped cream for serving

Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 325°F (165°C). Generously butter a 9-by-13-inch (23-by-33-cm.) baking dish.

Spread the challah slices thickly and evenly with the butter. Cut the slices in half crosswise. Lay the slices in the dish so that they overlap slightly.

In a bowl, whisk together the whole eggs, egg yolks, milk, cream, sugar, salt, vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Pour evenly over the bread. Let stand for about 30 minutes so that the bread soaks up the custard (occasionally press down on the bread for extra absorption).

Bake the pudding for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, gently warm the marmalade in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Remove the pudding from the oven and carefully spread the marmalade over the top. Return to the oven and bake until the top is crisp, brown, and sticky, about 10 minutes longer. Let stand for about 10 minutes before serving big scoops of the pudding garnished with lightly whipped cream. Serves 8.

/>For more great rolls and other baking recipes be sure to check out our latest book, Williams-Sonoma Home Baked Comfort , by Kim Laidlaw.


Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C/Gas mark 4
  2. Spread three slices of the bread with butter, then marmalade, and top with the other three slices. Spread some butter on top of each sandwich and cut each one into four.
  3. Lay the squares, buttered side up, slightly overlapping, in a buttered, ovenproof dish.
  4. Whisk the eggs, milk, caster sugar and vanilla extract together and pour over the dish. Let it stand for about half an hour, to allow the mixture to soak in.
  5. Sprinkle the demerara sugar over the surface.
  6. Bake for about 45 minutes, until it is puffed up and the top is golden.
  7. Serve with cream or ice cream.

Paddington's Cookery Book by Michael Bond, recipes by Lesley Young and illustrated by R. W. Alley, is published by HarperCollins Children&rsquos. Available now.


Marmalade Bread-and-Butter Pudding Recipe

Butter one side of each piece of bread, then spread half of the slices with marmalade. Top with the other slices of bread to make sandwiches, cut in half and arrange snugly in baking dish. Beat the eggs, milk, cream, orange zest and sugar together and pour over. Top with a little extra marmalade- especially the rind, if liked. Place the baking dish in a baking tray half filled with boiling water.

Bake for 35-45 mins until golden brown and the custard has set.

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Marmalade and Cointreau bread and butter pudding

Who can resist an orange-flavoured pudding that reminds them of childhood, with a touch of Cointreau for the grown ups? Not me, that’s for sure.

Preparation

Cooking

Skill level

Toss the dried fruit with the Cointreau or Grand Marnier and allow to stand, ideally for a few hours or even overnight.

Preheat oven to 180°C and grease a 2 L casserole dish.

Butter each slice of bread generously, smearing every second one with marmalade and lay over base of prepared casserole pan, overlapping a little as you go. When you have one layer, sprinkle over some dried soaked fruit, then continue layering until you’ve used all the bread and dried soaked fruit. I put the crust-side up when it overlaps, so it pokes up and bakes crisp, but it doesn’t really matter.

To make the custard, place the eggs, milk, vanilla essence and sugar together in a bowl, whisking to combine.

Pour the custard over the bread until all of the bread is moistened. You want to have the bread wet, but not so wet that it’s soupy. Allow to stand for 10 minutes to soak up custard. The ideal level of custard after a few minutes is just below the top of the bread. Sprinkle with extra sugar and bake for 45 minutes or until the custard has firmed right to the centre. Serve pudding warm or at room temperature.

As seen in Feast magazine, October 2013, Issue 25.

Ingredients

  • 160 g (about 1 cup) sultanas, raisins or currants (I like a mix)
  • 60 ml (¼ cup) Cointreau or Grand Marnier
  • 50 g unsalted butter, softened, plus extra, to grease
  • 250 g (about ½ loaf) rustic white bread, cut into 1½ cm slices
  • 170 g (¼ cup) good-quality Seville or cumquat marmalade
  • 8 eggs
  • 500 ml (2 cups) milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • 220 g (1 cup) caster sugar, plus 1 tbsp extra, to sprinkle

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Soaking time 2 hours 10 minutes
You will need a 2 L casserole pan or similar for this recipe.

Toss the dried fruit with the Cointreau or Grand Marnier and allow to stand, ideally for a few hours or even overnight.

Preheat oven to 180°C and grease a 2 L casserole dish.

Butter each slice of bread generously, smearing every second one with marmalade and lay over base of prepared casserole pan, overlapping a little as you go. When you have one layer, sprinkle over some dried soaked fruit, then continue layering until you’ve used all the bread and dried soaked fruit. I put the crust-side up when it overlaps, so it pokes up and bakes crisp, but it doesn’t really matter.

To make the custard, place the eggs, milk, vanilla essence and sugar together in a bowl, whisking to combine.

Pour the custard over the bread until all of the bread is moistened. You want to have the bread wet, but not so wet that it’s soupy. Allow to stand for 10 minutes to soak up custard. The ideal level of custard after a few minutes is just below the top of the bread. Sprinkle with extra sugar and bake for 45 minutes or until the custard has firmed right to the centre. Serve pudding warm or at room temperature.


Matt’s Bread and Butter Pudding

Bread and butter pudding is one of those desserts that takes me right back to my childhood. It was really cheap and easy to make so my Mum would often let me take care of it from an early age – she wasn’t see keen on the mess that followed!

As I grew older, I started playing around with my Mum’s recipe and adding a few additions. Some worked and some definitely didn’t, but I’ve now got it to the point where I’m happy with it. I pretty much lived off of this dessert when I was at university because it cost about £1 to make, would easily feed four people and it could be left in the fridge for a couple of days after (not that it ever happened when I was at university – too many kitchen vultures for that!).

When it comes to serving up bread and butter pudding, there’s all sorts that you can have with it. Some prefer custard, some prefer cream, but I’m really sad and still have what I had as a kid and that’s a small few drops of whole milk with it. It sounds strange and Laura often makes fun of me for it, but to be honest I’m not sure whether it’s the nostalgia or it actually is good. Alternatively, you could have ice cream with it, or even something like brandy butter, depending on how rich you like your deserts.


Bread and butter pudding: a delicious crowd-pleaser

Warm up those cold winter nights with Vanessa Greenwood's traditional bread and butter pudding recipe. Video: Cooks Academy Ireland Culinary School

My mum visited recently from Wales and while she was here insisted on making a bread and butter pudding. I think it was her way of getting in with her son-in-law. I have to hand it to her, home-made bread and butter pudding will get you on most people’s good side.

She is very particular about how she makes her deluxe bread and butter pudding and so she staged something of a kitchen takeover. Although this classic pudding can be made with any kind of bread, my mum would definitely recommend a white loaf which has a bit of texture (a tiger cob or bloomer will do fine).

Having said that, bread and butter pudding is a great way to use up any four-day-old sliced pan from the supermarket. Dry bread soaks up the custard without the pudding becoming too soggy. Leftover panettone, which is popular in the shops at this time of year, makes a posher version.

My mum enriches her version with an artisan orange and ginger marmalade stocked by her local butcher. If you don’t happen to have a jar of this to hand, use a richly flavoured bitter orange marmalade with the rind included. A whiskey marmalade would taste great too. Or you could soak the sultanas or cranberries in a little whiskey or brandy to add that touch of luxury.

While bread and butter pudding takes no time to assemble, the most important part is allowing time for the liquid custard to soak into the pudding before baking.

This is a very forgiving pudding, the kind even the smallest children can happily get involved with, though you might want to leave out any liqueur flavours in that case. Adding a few chocolate buttons may just get them to fall in love with baking for life. My mum doesn’t use a recipe for her bread and butter pudding. Similarly, you can easily adjust the quantities of bread or dried fruit to suit the size of dish you have. Marmalade isn’t to everyone’s taste but you could just as easily leave it out.


Watch the video: Τραγανά και μυρωδάτα Μπισκότα βουτύρου με μαρμελάδα. Πειρασμός σκέτος!!! (May 2022).