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Slaughterhouse Leak Turns Stream Red

Slaughterhouse Leak Turns Stream Red

An abattoir was leaking blood into a nearby stream

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A leak at a Swedish abattoir turned a local stream a disturbing shade of red.

A Swedish town that appeared to be undergoing some Biblical plagues recently has traced the problem to a local abattoir that sprung a leak and dumped blood into a nearby stream.

According to The Local, the slaughterhouse said the problem happened when a basin at the facility overflowed. The waste seeped out and turned an entire nearby stream a disturbing shade of red.

The head of the slaughterhouse said he thought it was only about 15 liters of blood that had leaked out, or “about as much blood as in a calf.” That was enough to turn the entire stream crimson, though.

“That’s enough to color 1,000 liters of water,” the slaughterhouse head admitted.

After the red water called attention to the problem, tests revealed the stream had 10 times the legal limit of ammonia nitrogen, which can be poisonous to humans. The slaughterhouse is currently under investigation for environmental crimes, in part because it took the abattoir three days to report the leak. The head of the slaughterhouse said the delay could not be helped, as it happened over a holiday weekend and there were no authorities available to report the incident to.


Piney Point deep well injection to proceed despite residents' drinking water concerns

PALMETTO, Fla. - It&aposs been nearly a month and no new wastewater discharges have been needed at the old Piney Point fertilizer plant after workers installed a steel plate to stop the leak. Now, the major concern is the remaining wastewater.

The Piney Point crisis was back in the spotlight Tuesday night as leaders addressed concerns about the long-term impacts from the leak at a meeting of Manatee County governments.

As of Monday, 205 million gallons of wastewater remain in the 77-acre storage pond at risk for leaks.

Last month, Manatee County commissioners approved a contract for the construction of a deep injection well to dispose of the wastewater, but not everyone is on board. The controversial procedure, which would inject the wastewater as deep as 3,500 feet underground, has some concerned about how it could impact the underground water supply.

Piney Point’s history of controversy

The Piney Point site dates back to the 1960s, when developers envisioned a phosphate mine and an oil refinery. The refinery was never built, but there has been no shortage of controversy since then, Lloyd Sowers reports.

"That is well into the lower aquifer which is saltwater, and that water moves from east to west and so when it goes down it&aposs going nowhere except under the Gulf of Mexico and under Tampa Bay," acting Manatee County administrator Dr. Scott Hopes said.

Water no longer being pumped out of Piney Point

A little more than a week after fears of a contaminated water flood led to a state of emergency, officials say they’ve been able to stop dumping wastewater from the old Piney Point phosphate mine.

Hopes assured the public at Tuesday&aposs night meeting the drinking water shouldn&apost be impacted because drinking water aquifers are typically anywhere from 1,500 to 3000 feet deep. The wastewater would be trapped under multiple impermeable layers of rock about 3,500 feet underground.

Meanwhile, there&aposs concern about the leak&aposs impact on red tide after low red tide levels were recorded off the coast of Manatee and Sarasota counties last week.

"We don&apost think those are a direct result of the Piney Point discharges, but they are something that researchers are keeping an eye on because any time these marine plants interact with food sources like nutrients and nitrogen it can make those blooms worse," Tampa Bay Estuary Program assistant director Maya Burke said.

So far, no dead fish have been reported as county leaders continue to discuss the future of the site.

At Tuesday night&aposs meeting, Hopes spoke about plans to possibly turn the site into a BMX park or soccer fields, ideas which will have to wait until the county can remove the waste that still remains at Piney Point.


The Food Chain’s Weakest Link: Slaughterhouses

A relatively small number of plants process much of the beef and pork in the United States, and some of them have closed because workers are getting sick.

The modern American slaughterhouse is a very different place from the one that Upton Sinclair depicted in his early-20th-century novel, “The Jungle.”

Many are giant, sleek refrigerated assembly lines, staffed mostly by unionized workers who slice, debone and “gut snatch” hog and beef carcasses, under constant oversight of government inspectors. The jobs are often grueling and sometimes dangerous, but pork and beef producers boast about having some of the most heavily sanitized work spaces of any industry.

Yet meat plants, honed over decades for maximum efficiency and profit, have become major “hot spots” for the coronavirus pandemic, with some reporting widespread illnesses among their workers. The health crisis has revealed how these plants are becoming the weakest link in the nation’s food supply chain, posing a serious challenge to meat production.

After decades of consolidation, there are about 800 federally inspected slaughterhouses in the United States, processing billions of pounds of meat for food stores each year. But a relatively small number of them account for the vast majority of production. In the cattle industry, a little more than 50 plants are responsible for as much as 98 percent of slaughtering and processing in the United States, according to Cassandra Fish, a beef analyst.

Shutting down one plant, even for a few weeks, is like closing an airport hub. It backs up hog and beef production across the country, crushes prices paid to farmers and eventually leads to months of meat shortages.

“Slaughterhouses are a critical bottleneck in the system,” said Julie Niederhoff, an associate professor of supply chain management at Syracuse University. “When they go down, we are in trouble.”

The ripple effects of the virus are now being felt across the entire meat supply chain, all the way to grocery store freezers.

More than a dozen beef, pork and chicken processing plants have closed or are running at greatly reduced speeds because of the pandemic. This past week, the number of cattle slaughtered dropped nearly 22 percent from the same period a year ago, while hog slaughter was down 6 percent, according to the Department of Agriculture. The decline is partly driven by the shutdown of restaurants and hotels, but plant closings have also caused a major disruption, leaving many ranchers with nowhere to send their animals.

Even as one prominent meat executive warned on Easter that the nation was “perilously close” to a meat shortage, state and federal regulators have been sending mixed signals to the industry about how to deal with the crisis.

In South Dakota, Gov. Kristi Noem requested publicly that Smithfield Foods close its huge pork facility in Sioux Falls after testing revealed that the plant accounted for nearly half the coronavirus cases in the city and the surrounding county. But federal officials had been repeatedly urging the company and other meat producers to find ways to keep their plants running because of their importance to the food supply, according to two people briefed on the matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal discussions.

By Thursday, the tests had revealed that the pork plant was the nation’s single largest “hot spot,” with about 16 percent of the 3,700 employees testing positive for the virus. The hospitalization rate among the workers has been relatively low because they tend to be younger, said Dr. David Basel, a vice president at the Avera Medical Group in Sioux Falls, who has been involved in the testing of the Smithfield employees.

Dr. Basel praised Smithfield for encouraging its employees, many of whom are refugees and immigrants from Latin America and Asia and speak 80 different dialects, to get tested. Doctors made instructional videos in Nepalese and Spanish, and tracked down and tested workers who had been in close contact with infected employees.

“The numbers are improving after the plant closed,” Dr. Basel said. “I am feeling more optimistic this week.”


Slaughterhouse waste - wastewater produces biogas

The chemical oxygen demand of the wastewater mixtures of slaughterhouses (red water + green water + washing water) is in the order of 6,000 - 10,000 mg/L.

Anaerobic digestion is one of the best options for slaughterhouse waste management which will lead to production of energy-rich biogas. Can achieve a high degree of COD and BOD removal from slaughterhouse effluent at a significantly lower cost than comparable aerobic systems. The biogas potential of slaughterhouse waste is higher than animal manure, and reported to be in the range of 80-120 m3 biogas per ton of wastes.

Biogas can be used as fuel in generators for the production of electricity or in boilers for the production of steam. Using the biogas from animal by-products (ABP) digestion, the slaughterhouse facility may cover most of its heat demand and some of the electricity requirements.

A digester in slaughterhouse for 500 cattles/day can produce 2,500 m3 biogas usefull to install a 250 kW electricity generator. For each 1,000 m3 of biogas used to produce steam, a 20-25 BHP boiler can be installed.


A Siberian River Has Mysteriously Turned Blood Red

The Daldykan River in Siberia has recently turned red, and the cause is not yet known.

Alarmed Russians are sharing photos on social media of a Siberian river that has suddenly and mysteriously turned blood red.

Russian authorities are trying to determine the cause of the ominous change to the Daldykan River, located above the Arctic Circle and flowing through the mining town of Norilsk. Photos posted on Facebook by the Association of the Indigenous Peoples of the Taimir Peninsula clearly show the river has turned a vivid red.

As National Geographic reported, two major theories are emerging to explain the change. "The first is that the red color comes from the large quantity of iron that occurs naturally in the ground in that region," National Geographic said. "The second is a chemical leak."

Russia's Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment said in a statement that it suspects the latter explanation: "According to our initial information, a possible reason for the pollution of the river might be a break in the pipeline" belonging to a local factory, which is owned by the nickel and palladium giant Norilsk Nickel.

The ministry did not specify what kind of chemical may be leaking into the river. According to the BBC, the government daily Rossiiskaya Gazeta suggested that the pipeline could be leaking waste copper-nickel concentrate.

Despite the numerous social media posts and the government statement confirming the red color, Norilsk Nickel maintains everything is normal with the river. "The waters show the natural tone the river and its mainstream are in regular condition, which goes against the information about any color changes due to an alleged case of large-scale river pollution," Norilsk Nickel said in a statement. It included photos such as this one, which it said were taken yesterday morning:

The company, Norilsk Nickel, released photos of the river it says were taken Wednesday, claiming it is in "regular condition." Norilsk Nickel hide caption

The company added that it has "strengthened the environmental monitoring in the area of the river and adjacent production facilities" and would test samples from the river this week.

This isn't the first time the river has changed color, according to multiple news outlets. The Guardian reported that some social media users said it had also happened in June. "Periodically there are accidents when these pipes break and the solutions spill and get into the Daldykan — that's why it changes colour," Denis Koshevoi, a Ph.D. candidate studying pollution in the area, told the newspaper.

"Incidents such as the polluting of the waters of Daldykan River is a common occurrence in the Russian Arctic because of a consistent irresponsible attitude towards environmental standards," Vladmir Chouprov, head of the energy program of Greenpeace Russia, said in a statement. "The Arctic ecosystem is extremely vulnerable scars of human impact need decades or even centuries to amend."

Area residents don't drink this water, as CNN reported. The network quoted the state news agency, saying "the river isn't connected to the public water supply and the incident doesn't pose an immediate threat to the residents' well-being."

The area has a tragic history, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reported from Norilsk in 2000. "Norilsk began as part of the gulag archipelago. Stalin sent prisoners there to extract the mineral wealth of Russia's frozen north," she said. "Workers lived in desolate, brutal prison camps. Only after 1956 did Soviets begin to go to Norilsk voluntarily to take high-paying mining jobs."

Michele described what it looked like during her visit: "As far as the eye can see there are cranes, polluting smokestacks from the smelters and rusty pipes winding through the trashed landscape of this Arctic city."


Step One: Combine the dry ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer fit with the dough hook. Add the ingredients in this order: flour, brown sugar, white sugar, salt and yeast.


Troubleshooting a Weak Flame on a Gas Grill

If you are experiencing a weak flame from your gas grill, try these troubleshooting tips before refilling the tank.

We’ve occasionally fired up our gas grills only to have the burners emit a tepid flame no matter how high we set the knobs. This does not mean it’s time to get a new tank of gas. Instead, we learned that a weak flame can be a signal that the safety regulator on the propane line—that aluminum device that sits near the end of the hose that attaches to the tank—has been tripped, slowing the flow of gas to a trickle.

This regulator is designed to respond to low gas pressure inside the hose, a sign that there’s a leak, but it can also be tripped accidentally if you turn on the grill burners before you open the valve on the tank. With the burner valves open, pressure never builds up inside the hose, and the regulator thinks it has detected a leak.

TO AVOID THE PROBLEM: Always make sure to open the valve on the tank before turning on the grill’s burners. And when you have finished grilling, be sure to turn off the burners before shutting off the gas flow from the tank.

TO FIX THE PROBLEM: If you forget the order of operations above, the steps at the right will show you how to reset the regulator and get your grill back up and running.

1. Turn off all burners.

2. Turn off valve on tank.

3. Detach regulator and hose from tank’s nozzle wait at least 30 seconds before reattaching it.


The Rzhev Slaughterhouse: The Red Army's Forgotten 15-Month Campaign Against Army Group Center, 1942-1943

I bought the Kindle version, and want to mention up-front that the author included several good maps - find them and bookmark them.

Svetlana Gerisimova's book greatly improved my understanding of the Nazi-Soviet war in the "central" front (just west of Moscow) during the period after the Red Army initial repulse of the Wehrmacht from Moscow in December 1941, until the Germans' tactical withdrawal in March 1943. She rightly describes the almost-unending attacks and counterattacks as the "slaughterhouse" that it was, and makes the case that the upper leadership of the Red Army in 1942 did not learn from repeated mistakes. It is also clear that the Germans selected the most defensible positions and then heavily fortified them, anticipating the assaults that they repeatedly repelled. While the heavy losses wore down both the Nazis and the Soviets, the author documents that the Red Army lost twice as many men in these battles as the Germans did, for very little gain in territory.

Stalin expected the spring of 1942 to bring a renewed assault on Moscow, but Hitler struck instead in the south. The Germans entrenched in the Rzhev salient used that spring and summer to instead dislodge Red Army forces and partisans from "rear" areas west and south of that salient, while successfully resisting ongoing attacks from the north and east. Though the Soviets lost more ground, more men and more armaments than the Germans did that summer and fall near Rzhev, they succeeded in tying up Army Group Center and preventing it from coming to the assistance of German forces in the south - especially after the Soviet counterattack at Stalingrad.

Readers outside Russia need to understand that one of Gerasimova's aims here is to contest Russia's official version of battles on this front, and her government's unwillingness to re-open the military records of this part of the Great Patriotic War. The book often pauses to contrast the memoirs of individual soldiers and officers on both sides with the "official" USSR/Russian version. There is not a lot of detail about specific battles. She is making her case that the Red Army's plan was to do at Rzhev what was done at Stalingrad - and that when this failed, the record was re-written to minimize both the plan and the losses, making it hard for the historian to re-create what really happened.

And when the Rzhev salient was finally recaptured at last in March 1943, it was not through successful Soviet attacks, but by a controlled Nazi retreat to a shorter, more defensible, front line - a further embarrassment to Stalin and the Red Army.

Seen from the larger perspective, both Hitler and Stalin believed themselves unbeatable, and acted recklessly in squandering men and machines. Hitler's early victories should have given Stalin pause, but in late 1942 he somehow thought he could beat the Germans in both the central front AND in the south. The Red Army succeeded at Stalingrad but not at Rzhev. Despite the bloodletting on all fronts, the Red Army grew progressively stronger and became better equipped and led as the war ground on, while the Germans proved unable to overcome losses on the scale of Stalingrad, Rzhev and elsewhere.

Four stars for those strongly interested in the war on the Eastern Front and the Red Army's leadership, but only three for the more casual reader.

Top critical review

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From the United States

I bought the Kindle version, and want to mention up-front that the author included several good maps - find them and bookmark them.

Svetlana Gerisimova's book greatly improved my understanding of the Nazi-Soviet war in the "central" front (just west of Moscow) during the period after the Red Army initial repulse of the Wehrmacht from Moscow in December 1941, until the Germans' tactical withdrawal in March 1943. She rightly describes the almost-unending attacks and counterattacks as the "slaughterhouse" that it was, and makes the case that the upper leadership of the Red Army in 1942 did not learn from repeated mistakes. It is also clear that the Germans selected the most defensible positions and then heavily fortified them, anticipating the assaults that they repeatedly repelled. While the heavy losses wore down both the Nazis and the Soviets, the author documents that the Red Army lost twice as many men in these battles as the Germans did, for very little gain in territory.

Stalin expected the spring of 1942 to bring a renewed assault on Moscow, but Hitler struck instead in the south. The Germans entrenched in the Rzhev salient used that spring and summer to instead dislodge Red Army forces and partisans from "rear" areas west and south of that salient, while successfully resisting ongoing attacks from the north and east. Though the Soviets lost more ground, more men and more armaments than the Germans did that summer and fall near Rzhev, they succeeded in tying up Army Group Center and preventing it from coming to the assistance of German forces in the south - especially after the Soviet counterattack at Stalingrad.

Readers outside Russia need to understand that one of Gerasimova's aims here is to contest Russia's official version of battles on this front, and her government's unwillingness to re-open the military records of this part of the Great Patriotic War. The book often pauses to contrast the memoirs of individual soldiers and officers on both sides with the "official" USSR/Russian version. There is not a lot of detail about specific battles. She is making her case that the Red Army's plan was to do at Rzhev what was done at Stalingrad - and that when this failed, the record was re-written to minimize both the plan and the losses, making it hard for the historian to re-create what really happened.

And when the Rzhev salient was finally recaptured at last in March 1943, it was not through successful Soviet attacks, but by a controlled Nazi retreat to a shorter, more defensible, front line - a further embarrassment to Stalin and the Red Army.

Seen from the larger perspective, both Hitler and Stalin believed themselves unbeatable, and acted recklessly in squandering men and machines. Hitler's early victories should have given Stalin pause, but in late 1942 he somehow thought he could beat the Germans in both the central front AND in the south. The Red Army succeeded at Stalingrad but not at Rzhev. Despite the bloodletting on all fronts, the Red Army grew progressively stronger and became better equipped and led as the war ground on, while the Germans proved unable to overcome losses on the scale of Stalingrad, Rzhev and elsewhere.

Four stars for those strongly interested in the war on the Eastern Front and the Red Army's leadership, but only three for the more casual reader.

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This is a remarkable book. As a vivid reader of literature on WW II in general and on the Eastern Front in particular, I am always interested in new analysis and discussions that feature the battles on this front, especially coming from Russian historians. The main reason is that while the Western and other countries archives were analyzed in a great extent for different studies, the Russian/Soviet archives still held the veal of secrecy. Future studies will probably benefit from this key information when they will be open to the public, clarifying some aspects of the struggle, not to mention some details of so-called "forgotten" battles (actually they are "covered lost battles"). Therefore, much of key information about WW II is still in Moscow.

As a prelude to the main story, Mrs. Gherasimova outlines a different "battle" with the official Russian historians about the place, role, casualties and significance of the 15-month Battle of Rzhev in the context of the Great Patriotic War. The controversies and debates are restated throughout the book about all aspects of the operations involved. We can discover a silent clash between generations of historians, and between official perspective (much still anchored in the traditional Soviet-era view) and the new Russian scholars.

Admitting that there is a real and time-consuming problem in solving all the aspects of this epic campaign author modestly claim that this book is a mere "skeleton" of an "unrecognized battle". Moreover, author accused "those who keep sources classified" for possible mistakes and wrong assertions in the book.
For the above reasons, at the end of the Introduction, the author asked a legitimate question "So, the Battle of Rzhev-is it a myth or a reality?"

In the chapter I (only 9 pages) author described the formation of the salient, the importance for both sides, troops involved, fortifications and the formidable size of German lines of defense.
Chapter II is dedicated to the First Rzhev-Viazma Offensive (8.01-20.04.1942), one of the largest operations on Eastern Front, which never received full and objective coverage from historians. With respect for the sides strength (page 28), I have some doubts (Soviets 688.000 men, 10.900 guns, 474 tanks vs. German 625.000 men, 11.000 guns and 354 tanks!), but the figures were extracted from latest edition Military encyclopedia, which explains many.

Combat during operations Hannover and Seydlitz (May-July 1942) are described in chapter III (20 pages). These less known operations, showed the Wehrmacht effort (23 divisions involved out of 77 units in AGC) to mop up the rear of AGC.

The second attempt to eradicate the salient was the First Rzhev-Sychevka Offensive (30 July-30 September 1942) fully described in chapter IV. In spite of trying to achieve the factor of surprise and to deploy overwhelming forces on the main axes of attacks on both fronts (Kalinin and Western), the Soviet offensive achieved only tactical successes (some attributed to the formation of blocking detachments and penal companies!) unable to achieve its final goal, sustaining almost 300.000 casualties.

The famous Operation Mars - "Second Rzhev - Sychevka offensive" (25.11-20.12), in the book- is analyzed from both operational point of view and impact. I was particularly interested about the success of Solomatin's 1st Mech Corps in penetrating 20 to 25 km of the enemy's lines and the powerful reserves provided to the German forces, in contrast to those provided to Romanian 3rd Army at Stalingrad. Large portions of the chapter discussed the casualties of the Russian forces (335.000 men), author stating that neither Glantz nor H.Grossman offered any figures for German casualties (p.122). It is true that D Glantz didn't mention the extent of the German casualties in his book, but in a subsequent article he wrote about 40.000 men.

Chapter VI (22 pages) is dedicated to the liquidation of the Rzhev salient (2-31.03.1943), largely a pursuit operation, that cost about 140.000 Soviet casualties. Both sides actually benefited from these operations and Soviets eventually regained this much-disputed territory. A year earlier (1942) a German retreat from this region could have saved them from Stalingrad debacle - shortening the front and making some reserves available. Moreover, an attack launched in 1942 from this held Axis regions towards Moscow, still within German reach, would have a telling effect instead of an offensive in south. A major offensive in this area would therefore have given the Germans a far better chance to deal the Red Army a knockout blow than an operation in the south.

The last chapter (Results of the battle) is the largest (36 pages), the most controversial and analytical. The debates from the beginning of the book are restated concerning both casualties and the place/significance of the battle. Author treated both issues presenting the perspectives different documents, comparative data from various versions. The discussions about casualties range from about 1 million to more than 2 million which make this battle one of the bloodiest in WW II, exceeding Battle of Stalingrad in many respects.

On the other hand, German casualties still remain to be tabulated.Efforts were made to arrange some German cemeteries and much work was done by the search teams to bury to discover and bury the remains of the fallen heroes. Some stories are compelling and emotional.
The importance of the Rzhev bulge in immobilize an increasing number of German divisions, the influence of the last offensives in sapping German 9th Army strength before its participation in Battle of Kursk were also discussed. Also, the question if this 15-month campaign is or not part of Battle of Moscow or it is an independent battle remains unanswered, largely because of official opposition.

There are about 120+ photographs which do an excellent job at showing various actions, pieces of military equipment and the environment the battle took place in. After the main chapters 36 appendices are describing various Stavka and General Staff concerning matters of the combat operations and even appointments (dismisses) in the area of the salient.
In addition to the excellent narrative, the author presents 8 quality colored maps showing the main operations described in the study. The book also includes 8 tables, an impressive 14-page Bibliography (unpublished documents from TsAMO, wartime periodical literature, scholarly works etc), a short note section and closes with an index.


After months on lam, slaughterhouse escapee beefalo caught in Connecticut

PLYMOUTH, Conn. (AP) — After more than 250 days on the run, an 800- to 900-pound (360- to 410-kilogram) beefalo that has been roaming the woods in western Connecticut since it escaped on its way to a slaughterhouse has been captured, police said.

The beefalo — a cross between a bison and domestic cattle — eluded its handlers on Aug. 3, while being loaded off a truck at a meat processing business in Plymouth.

Nicknamed “Buddy,” his adventures, including appearances on a wildlife camera set up by police and failed attempts to lure him into a pen with food, gained widespread attention and inspired the creation of several social media accounts in his name.

Plymouth police announced his apprehension on Wednesday, posting the animal’s picture on social media with the word “Captured” stamped across it in red letters. A second photo shows Buddy in a pen.

Buddy had wandered onto a farm in town and was hanging out with some cows when the farm owner snagged him and eventually got him into a trailer, Plymouth police Capt. Edward Benecchi told The Hartford Courant.

“His capture was the result of a community effort from spotting him, feeding him throughout the winter and to the experts who were able to make the final capture,” police said in the post. “We would like to thank all those would brought this adventure to a successful resolution.”

Authorities decided early on in their search not to seek the death penalty for Buddy and have raised money for his continued care.

Police said the beefalo will be heading to Massachusetts for a veterinary exam and will then be sent to the Critter Critter Creek Farm Sanctuary in Gainesville, Florida.

“Without everyone’s donations this would not be possible,” police said. “Thank you for all your continued support and we wish Buddy safe travels and happy life.”

(Copyright (c) 2021 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)


4 Quick Turnip Recipes

Rooting around for an in-season vegetable with inspiring possibilities? Turn to the turnip.

Learn how to choose, store and prepare turnips, then try these tasty recipes.

Saut Turnips and Greens
Cook peeled and cut-up turnips and sliced garlic in olive oil in a large skillet until tender. Add the turnip greens and cook until just wilted. Season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice.

Roasted Turnips With Ginger
Peel and cut turnips into wedges. Toss with sliced fresh ginger, canola oil, salt, and pepper on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with honey and roast at 400° F until tender.

Mashed Turnips With Crispy Bacon
Simmer peeled and cut-up turnips in boiling salted water until tender. Drain and mash with butter, salt, and pepper. Fold in crumbled cooked bacon and chopped chives top with shaved Parmesan.

Creamy Leek and Turnip Soup
Cook thinly sliced leeks in butter in a large saucepan until soft. Add peeled and cut-up turnips and enough chicken broth to cover. Simmer until very tender. Puree until smooth, adding water or broth as necessary to adjust the consistency. Season with salt and pepper.


Watch the video: Chinese executions exposed by rare photos (September 2021).