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The World's Best Sushi Is in... Los Angeles?

The World's Best Sushi Is in... Los Angeles?

There was an interesting little Los Angeles culinary mystery buried in a discussion at the New York City Wine & Food Festival last weekend. It came from an exchange between the interviewer, former New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni and his subject, the world's most famous chef, Ferran Adrià:

Ferran: “When you feel that the place is exciting, you really want to go to it. There’s a place in Los Angeles that makes the best sushi I know of in the world. I’ve only been once, a reservation is tough. José Andrés has been 20 times… in the past six months. And I’ve been to Japan to some of the country’s best sushi places. And I was at this place and I thought, ”How is this possible?” The rice was like this. The fish was set perfectly on top. And I thought, 'How is this possible?'”

Bruni: “I think you’re going to have to give them the name of the place.”

Ferran: “I can never remember.”

Both Bruni and Ferran executed perfect timing with their deliveries. The exchange drew big laughs — you could almost see them taking their act on the road. But wait, seriously? The world's best sushi isn't in Japan, but in Los Angeles? Not to take anything away from Angelenos, there's certainly some marvelous food out in L.A. But this was some high praise. Where was this sushi Brigadoon?

Frank Bruni and Ferran Adrià's translator listening to the chef.

Was it an after-hours hole-in-the-wall manned by some seafood maestro? An itamae with magic hands who has memorized secret recipes for sushi rice and the perfect ratio of fish to rice, secrets passed on through generations from one culinary guru to the next chosen one? Was this place the stage for the last remaining sushi ninja of an unparalleled clan of experts who guard the sushi secrets of the ancients? Was there some other drama or backstory? Was it a little-known place helmed by a sushi chef who had defied tradition, shamed his family, and gone to the States to make his way, and in the process revolutionized sushi?

Was it one of the big name sushi spots in L.A. that any Angeleno worth his soy sauce would be able to easily rattle off? Or is the best sushi in the world being served right under your nose, at some Angeleno's local spot that they hit up once a week. Was it Urasawa? Hiroyuki Urasawa worked under Masa when he had Ginzu Shiko in Beverly Hills. Or Nishimura maybe? If anyone would know, it would be chef José Andrés, right? According to Ferran, he'd been 20 times in six months.

There are a couple of explanations. Sure, they could really just not remember, but that only makes the question more intriguing. It can't be a big name spot, right? Wouldn't they be able to remember it? One possibility? A celebratory state while visiting the restaurant that precludes any chance of remembering its name. Or, they're keeping it a secret.

A second inquiry to chef Andrés — this one to his assistant — proved to be a little more fruitful. She said she wasn't certain, but that it might be Sushi Zo because the chef always wants to go there. If it is Sushi Zo, the West LA spot actually has several of the characteristics noted above. It's widely regarded as the some of the best sushi in the city. It's omakase-only. It knocked Urasawa off its Zagat perch last year. And it's located in a strip mall next to a taco joint.

So, do you think Sushi Zo is the spot Ferran was calling the best in the world? Any other suggestions for which restaurant he could have been referring to? And is Sushi Zo, Nishimura, Urasawa, or your own pick really better than sushi in Japan? It's a culinary riddle wrapped in nori somewhere in between the 101 and the 10. Weigh in with comments, or send an email.

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Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Best Affordable Omakase Sushi in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is home to some of the country’s best sushi restaurants. The city plays a critical role in America’s sushi history, with the first sushi shop in the U.S. opening its doors in LA’s Little Tokyo neighborhood over 50 years ago. Since then, the craving for sushi has proliferated and you’d be hard pressed to stumble upon a strip mall in LA that doesn’t feature a sushi restaurant.

The meal tends to go one of two ways: ordering nigiri and maybe a hand roll or two a la carte or opting for an omakase dinner where you “trust the chef.” The latter is usually reserved for special occasions since it typically commands a higher price tag, especially if a renowned sushi chef is preparing the meal. An omakase dinner can easily go for more than $300 per person in a large city like LA.

While there’s no shortage of high-end sushi restaurants, affordable omakase options do exist if you know where to look. Try these high-quality omakase meals for under $100 in one of the sushi capitals of the world.

People tend to be skeptical of inexpensive raw fish, but Uzumaki shatters stereotypes sparked by the words “affordable sushi.” There are three omakase price points: you can opt for an $18 lunch called the “Uzu,” a $23 medium sized omakase called the Uzumaki, and a $34 dinner called the “Uzumaki Plus,” which features ceviche, edamame, 8 pieces of nigiri, and a cut roll. Every bite looks and tastes expertly prepared. The rice is at a balanced temperature and acidity (not too warm or sweet). The fish is sliced generously and seasoned with just the right amount of garnish and a brush of soy sauce. Lastly, the space is gorgeously designed in the quintessential minimalist Japanese aesthetic with incredibly attentive service, which further elevates the dining experience beyond what the price point might suggest. You can’t go wrong with a meal here.

If you’re ever in the South Bay of Los Angeles, you’ll need to find a way to reserve a sushi bar seat at Sushi Chitose. The basic omakase will run you $45 but if you’re feeling indulgent, opt for the premium meal at $60. You’ll be served roughly 20 courses of extremely fresh, melt-in-your-mouth nigiri, hand rolls and dessert. The plain exterior is easily missable and the interior is just as simple. This is good news, because nothing will distract you from the excellent omakase you will be experiencing there. Depending on the season, the stars are the oyster, toro, king salmon, and eel. Everything is incredible. This is an omakase that won’t disappoint.

220 S Raymond Ave Ste 102

Tucked away in a mall plaza in Pasadena, you’ll find an old-school sushi restaurant helmed by Chef Ike and his team who truly love their craft. The move at Sushi Kimagure is the Hana Omakase option for $72 if you’d like to focus on nigiri. The top bites here are the seared salmon and scallop, but you can taste the freshness and craft in each and every piece served. Book seats in advance so you can have Chef Ike prepare your meal at the sushi bar and walk you through each course. The chawanmushi (savory steamed egg) and the mochi dessert round out the omakase. If you can somehow manage to fit more into your stomach after it ends, items are available a la carte, too.

Another strip-mall legend. Hamasaku clocks in at $80 for the seasonal sushi omakase. Although it’s priced a little higher than the rest of the omakase options on this list, you get a high-end experience at a great value. The price includes an appetizer, 6 pieces of sashimi, 14 different pieces of seasonal sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and dessert. Depending on when you go, the toro and sea bass are standouts. All of the fish is fresh and the restaurant decor is beautiful. Make a reservation beforehand to secure a seat at the bar.


Watch the video: Best Sushi in Japan - Tsukiji Fish Market to $300 HIGH-END SUSHI in Tokyo! Japanese Food (December 2021).