New recipes

9 Quotations to Feel Better About Thanksgiving With the Family

9 Quotations to Feel Better About Thanksgiving With the Family

Thanksgiving with the family can be a bit emotionally demanding and I can assure you, you’re not the only one who feels this way. But that is not to say consuming amazing comfort food with not-so-comforting-but-occasionally-comforting company is the worst situation to be in! The holidays are just not the time to let second cousin Stanley get under your skin or to stand your ground with Aunt Lisa, and that’s what makes them tongue bitingly challenging.

Speaking to tradition, Thanksgiving is after all the time to “break bread” and be thankful for the food on your plate and the people you care about! With Thanksgiving tomorrow, prep yourself with these grin-worthy quotations about Turkey Day:

(For optimal results, re-read on November 24)

I like football. I find it’s an exciting strategic game. It's a great way to avoid conversation with your family at Thanksgiving. Craig Ferguson

Thanksgiving dinners take eighteen hours to prepare. They are consumed in twelve minutes. Half-times take twelve minutes. This is not a coincidence. Erma Bombeck

Thanksgiving is an emotional time. People travel thousands of miles to be with people they only see once a year. And then discover once a year is way too often. Johnny Carson

Thanksgiving is a magical time of year when families across the country join together to raise America’s obesity statistics. Personally, I love Thanksgiving traditions: watching football, making pumpkin pie, and saying the magic phrase that sends your aunt storming out of the dining room to sit in her car. Stephen Colbert

Thanksgiving. It’s like we didn’t even try to come up with a tradition. The tradition is, we overeat. “Hey, how about at Thanksgiving we just eat a lot?” “But we do that every day!” “Oh. What if we eat a lot with people that annoy the hell out of us?” Jim Gaffigan

It’s almost Thanksgiving! A day when you get to hear your extended family use racial slurs for groups who are not taking their jobs away. Jen Kirkman

Thanksgiving is the day when you turn to another family member and say, “How long has Mom been drinking like this?” My Mom, after six Bloody Marys looks at the turkey and goes, “Here, kitty, kitty. David Letterman

Fifty percent of the nation is covered in snow. Record low temperatures, a very cold autumn so far. But on the bright side, you're one good ice storm away from getting out of Thanksgiving with the in-laws. Jimmy Kimmel

But we must not forget:

After a good dinner, one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations. Oscar Wilde


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


20 Thanksgiving Poems to Recite at Your Holiday Table

Join the poets in celebrating the harvest, the food, the pumpkins, the family, and, of course, the almighty turkey!

One of the best moments on Thanksgiving Day, after the perfectly cooked turkey has been fetched from the oven and the Thanksgiving table setting has been arranged and your crazy Uncle Gary has told his hundredth story, is finally sitting down at the dinner table with the whole family. Many families have a tradition of going around and sharing something they are thankful for. When it comes around to your turn this year, why not share a Thanksgiving poem or one of the many thanksgiving or gratitude quotes out there? You could even get the whole family involved and have everyone pick their favorite poem and have a Thanksgiving poetry reading&mdashafter the meal, of course. We wouldn't want the food getting cold! When everyone sits down with their favorite slice of Thanksgiving pie or dessert, your poetry reading will include poems from some of the greats in history, from all walks of life and backgrounds. Some were inspired by the changing season, the harvest, and their faith. And others were just inspired by the star of the show, Mr. Turkey. However you make your Thanksgiving Day more creative, take some time to make spaces for gratitude and connection with family and friends around the table.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,&mdash
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood&mdash
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie

A Song for Merry Harvest

Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep its fullest, loudest string.
The bee below, the bird above, are teaching us to sing
A song for merry harvest and the one who will not bear
His grateful part partakes a boon he ill deserves to share.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his quick and trembling notes
The laughter of the gleaner&rsquos child, the heart&rsquos own music floats.
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from every voice that lives
Should welcome merry harvest, and bless the God that gives.

A Thanksgiving Poem

Thou hast, with ever watchful eye,
Looked down on us with holy care,
And from thy storehouse in the sky
Hast scattered plenty everywhere.

Then lift we up our songs of praise
To thee, O Father, good and kind
To thee we consecrate our days
Be thine the temple of each mind.

With incense sweet our thanks ascend
Before thy works our powers pall
Though we should strive years without end,
We could not thank thee for them all.

The Harvest Moon

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves
The song-birds leave us at the summer's close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Thanksgiving

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o&rsquoer us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

The Pumpkin

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South comes the pilgrim and guest
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

No ghosts or goblins and trick-or-treats,
No candy or flowers for your sweets.
No gifts to buy or presents to give,
Just be THANKFUL for the life that you live.

King for A Day

I'm resting here quite regally,
The feature of the table.
Surrounded by potatoes that
I'd taste if I were able.

My subjects, scrubbed and beaming,
Circle round the royal platter.
They seem to be adoring me,
But something is the matter.

See me basking in the candlelight,
My skin so nicely tanned.
The reason for this treatment,
I do not understand.

While I'd love to peck that dish of corn
And gobble down a berry,
I find this jolly atmosphere
To be a trifle scary.

These human creatures were my friends.
They filled me up with bread,
But now I have suspicions that
They're cannibals instead!


Watch the video: Η ΚΑΛΥΤΕΡΗ ΠΑΡΑΛΙΑ + ΣΟΥΒΛΑΤΖΙΔΙΚΟ DRAMA VLOG. Vea Bak (December 2021).