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3 Kid-Friendly Treats to Celebrate Passover

3 Kid-Friendly Treats to Celebrate Passover

Matzo-based edibles that kids can (nearly on their own) make in the kitchen.

During Passover, the consumption of leavened breads and other fermented grain products is prohibited in Jewish culture. Tori Avey of The Shiksa in the Kitchen says this is to commemorate the Jews’ freedom from Egyptian slavery, as when they “escaped Egypt (led by Moses), they didn’t have time to let their breads rise before going into the desert.” The banned leavened products, known as chametz, include baked goods, breadcrumbs, crackers — and bread, of course. Unleavened bread, like matzo, is traditionally used in their place.

Many use matzo like a cracker or a piece of toast, slathering peanut butter and jelly on top. Others eat it with butter, smoked salmon, or simply plain. But why not use it to make a cake or pizza? This Passover, infuse some fun into your other holiday traditions with some seemingly conventional treats that kids can make themselves — all featuring matzo.

Hosting a playdate? This cheesy matzo pizza is a favorite of Avey’s family and takes mere minutes to make. Craving something sweet? A chocolate and matzo multi-layered cake is another edible project that takes almost no time to make and is something even young kids can assemble (albeit messy, too). It's a unique dessert that works for a more formal gathering or dinner party, too. And once Mom or Dad combines the mixture for these fruit and nut-laden truffles, kids will enjoy rolling one-bite sized balls between their hands. (They're not just for Passover, either.)

3 Kid-Friendly Passover Treats


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.


Sweet Treats and Creative Crafts for Passover

Passover begins at sunset on March 27 and ends the evening of April 4 this year. To celebrate the holiday, Heather Corrigan, a longtime Macaroni Kid Mom and realtor at RE/MAX Signature Homes in Closter, shares recipes and kid-friendly projects with us.

The Cup of Miriam: A Simple Craft for Kids and Teens



The cup of Elijah is a staple at every Seder, but not many folks know about the cup of Miriam. As the story of Passover goes, Miriam saved her baby brother Moses by hiding him in the river where the Pharaoh's daughter found him and raised him as her own. Had it not been for Miriam, Moses would not have freed the Jews from slavery.

A wine glass filled with water is placed on the Seder table to represent Miriam. Your kids can make their own cup of Miriam using a plastic wine glass or a real one so that they can keep it for years to come. To decorate it, use enamel paint, colored Sharpies, or glitter glue.

Passover is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the story of Exodus, when ancient Israelites were freed from Egyptian slavery. Charoset is traditionally made with apples, cinnamon, wine and nuts. Charoset represents the sweetness of the ancient Israelites being freed from Egyptian slavery many years ago. We like this sephardic recipe for charoset to use as a spread on matzah.

Heather's Heydayz Matzah Brittle



My matzah brittle is always a hit. And it is so simple to make!

Ingredients:

3 1/2 sheets unsalted matzahs

1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1 cup semisweet chocolate morsel

1/3 cup finely chopped toasted slivered almonds

Line a 15x10 inch jelly-roll pan with nonstick aluminum foil. Arrange matzahs in prepared pan, breaking as necessary to fit and completely cover bottom of pan. Bring butter and brown sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Boil, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Carefully pour mixture evenly over matzahs in pan, and spread over matzahs. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Mixture will start to bubble at about 10 minutes. Continue to bake to 15 minutes).

Carefully remove pan from oven to a wire rack. (Mixture will still be bubbly). Let stand 1 minute at room temperature or until no longer bubbly. Sprinkle top evenly with morsels let stand 1 minute or until morsels soften. Spread morsels over brittle. Sprinkle with almonds let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Place pan in refrigerator, chill 30 minutes or until chocolate is firm. Break into about 20 pieces. Store in an airtight container up to 1 week in refrigerator. Makes about 20 pieces or 1 1/2 pounds




Everyone at a Seder dinner has a cushion to lean on to mimic how people in the ancient past used to recline on cushions during meals. Eating Seder dinner in a reclining position is meant to remind Jews that they are now free people and no longer slaves, so it's important to get comfy with leaning pillows! We made their own Seder pillow by tie-dying an old (or new) shirt, stuffing it with pillow fill, and tying the ends together with curling ribbon. The kids loved personalizing their pillows, and they make for great conversation!

Now it's your turn! Share with us your favorite Passover recipes and traditions in the comments section below or share on our Facebook page.




Call Heather The #HURRICANE to celebrate passover in your new home! Heather Corrigan is a 5 star, Gold Level Circle of Excellence NJ real estate agent who was recently featured in Bergen County REAL Producers Magazine. For information on buying, selling, renting, call Heather at 917-440-3767, email her [email protected], visit her website https://heatherthehurricaneremaxrealtor.com, or text "Hurricane" to 21000 for an e-card. Become a fan on Facebook.

WANT MORE FAMILY FUN?

Proudly serving Northeast Bergen County area families in Closter, Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, Old Tappan, Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Westwood, and Woodcliff Lake since 2010.