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Foodstagramming: Take a Picture, It’ll Last Longer

Foodstagramming: Take a Picture, It’ll Last Longer

If you’re a fellow Instagrammer like myself, you’ve probably noticed there’s one thing that nearly everyone with an account will snap pics of: food. Whether it’s breakfast, a fancy dinner from abroad or a Starbucks red cup (thank god they’re back), everyone will take a moment to pick out a filter and share what’s on the table. At first glance, this seems totally normal. Who doesn’t love looking at pictures of drool-inducing meals? Still, I can’t help but wonder why people love to share their every meal when instead they could be… ya know… eating it.

As it turns out, those who share photos of their delicious edibles are actually doing us all a little dieting favor. Studies have found that looking at pictures of food can actually make you less hungry since your brain experiences boredom after looking at the food for so long. So in essence, your brain is getting full rather than your stomach. Which is pretty trippy.

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But the question still remains: what’s the attraction of uploading a picture of your beautiful meal when its fate is to be eaten and therefore destroyed?

As far as I can tell, social media has taught us to publish our every move for the rest of the world to soak in. And, all things considered, food is a huge (let’s be honest — the best) part of someone’s day-to-day adventures. Sometimes, though, it just seems cruel to look at a picture of a mouth-watering dessert or a savory meal from your favorite restaurant that you aren’t enjoying.

If you’re prepared for the potential sadness that may come from looking at delicious pixels, there are endless Instagram accounts that fulfill any sudden craving, for example Love Food or the locally famous Sava’s.

Whether you’re an avid Instagrammer or a foodie just trying to vicariously experience the delight of a good meal, look not further than a photo. As science would have it, turns out a picture is worth a thousand bites, too.

Bah-dum tsh.

The post Foodstagramming: Take a Picture, It’ll Last Longer appeared first on Spoon University.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


A five-pound bag of potatoes is without question one of the biggest bargains in the produce department. For about $4, you'll get enough potatoes to make a many meals. Bake them, toss them into soups, add them to casseroles, or make potato salad or a big batch of oven fries. Potatoes are incredibly versatile, and if you store them properly, they'll easily keep for four to six months. Some potato varieties are particularly good for storing. These include Yukon gold, russet, Kennebec, Katahdin, and red Pontiac.

Beans cost much less than meat and are a source of protein, fiber, and minerals. Load up on canned beans, or save even more by purchasing dried beans and cooking them yourself. One pound of dried beans costs about $1.50 and is enough to make 6 cups of cooked beans. That's the equivalent of four cans of beans.

If you don't want to fuss with soaking dried beans, use lentils. They don't have to be soaked first and they cook quickly.

Dried beans are best used within a year but can be stored longer. Be sure to add extra cooking time when using older beans.

A half-cup serving of rice costs just five cents and is the perfect base for a filling meal. Rice is an important staple throughout most of the world, so you won't have any trouble finding a large variety of recipes for it.

White rice has an incredible shelf life. It'll keep for four to five years in the pantry. Brown rice has is more nutritious but has a shorter shelf life, lasting six to eight months in the pantry and eight to 12 months in the refrigerator. Since brown rice is more nutrient-dense, consider keeping it in the freezer, where it'll stay usable forever.


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